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Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust, which also runs City Hospital in Birmingham and Rowley Regis Hospital, has been given a requires improvement rating from the Care Quality Commission.

England’s Chief Inspector of Hospitals has rated the services provided by Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust as Requires Improvement following an inspection by the Care Quality Commission.

This inspection included the following core services; emergency department, medical services, surgery services, end of life care services, outpatient and diagnostic imaging services and the Birmingham Midland Eye Centre. Further unannounced inspections were carried out on 6, 11, 12 and 13 April 2017.

CQC has rated the trust as Requires Improvement overall. It was rated as Outstanding for being caring, Good for being well-led and Requires Improvement for being safe, effective, responsive. The trust’s previous rating was Requires Improvement.

Inspectors found that many services had improved since our 2015 inspection with End of Life Care being rated as Outstanding at both hospitals and in the community service; however, community inpatients was rated as inadequate.

CQC’s Chief Inspector of Hospitals, Professor Ted Baker, said:

“Although some improvements had been noted since our previous from October 2014, the trust had not made all the necessary changes to alter their rating.”

“Staff in the outpatients department did not have their competencies assessed to ensure they were confident and competent to carry out their role. The trust did not always ensure there was enough staffing or appropriate skill mix.”

“CQC rated the community inpatient services as inadequate because of lack of mental health capacity assessments, poor care planning and inconsistent assessment of risk.”

“Paediatric Ophthalmology services were delivered in a service that was not focused on the needs of children.”

“Despite these concerns, we found a number of areas of outstanding and good practice across Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust. “Staff must be particularly commended for their caring approach and we rated this area as Outstanding overall. We also rated end of life services and community health services for children and young people as Outstanding.”

“Patients and family members said that the care was not only excellent but that staff always went that extra mile. We observed interactions across the trust and spoke to numerous patients and relatives whom said they were treated well and kept up to date and well informed about their treatment.”

“The trust leadership knows what it needs to do to bring about improvement in the areas identified and our inspectors will return at a later date to check on what progress has been made.”

The CQC has told the trust it must take action in several areas, including:

  • Patients in the emergency department must receive treatment within one hour of arriving in line with the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM) recommendation.
  • Medical care services must ensure temporary staff being used are competent to fulfil the role.
  • Records of care and treatment in surgery provided to patients are accurate and complete.
  • The trust must ensure doctors use the appropriate proforma in place for effective clinical pathways.
  • The trust must improve local governance and ensure risks to the service are escalated, recorded, actioned and reviewed in a timely manner.

Inspectors saw several areas of outstanding practice, including:

  • The palliative and end of life care service ensured that patients and their families were involved in their care and their choices and preferences were upheld, including where they would prefer to be for their care and when they died.
  • Staff showed great compassion, empathy and an understanding of patient’s needs and preferences.
  • Newton 4 ward at Sandwell displayed a high-level person centred care approach. A number of innovative practices were developed on this ward, which included the breakfast therapy club to aid with patient rehabilitation, rewarded by the Stroke Association.
  • The palliative and end of life care service integrated coordination hub acted as one single point of access for patients and health professionals to coordinate end of life services for patients.

Full reports for the trust are available on the cqc website.

When faced with illness or immobility, it can be a struggle to carry out everyday activities that you may have once performed with ease. Our discreet personal care service is designed to support you with your day-to-day living, as well as providing you with the encouragement and emotional support that you may need to remain living independently. Our personal care service can assist you with personal hygiene needs ( washing, dressing, continence care) administering medication, at a time to suit your convenience. Maintaining your dignity is of paramount importance to us, which is why our Carers will ensure you feel comfortable at all times.

The best person to know what support you need to remain as independent as possible in your own home is you. That is why everything we do is designed around your needs and goals. These can be relatively simple like help with shopping through to high dependency 24 hour care.

  • Housekeeping
  • Personal care
  • Companionship
  • Support with information and advice
  • Housing support
  • High dependency care
  • Live-in care
  • Respite care
  • Medication management
  • Hospital to Home service
  • Complex and specialist care

Home care  can be arranged on an hourly, daily, weekly basis or a much longer plan to suit your needs. We  provides in-home care and support services to people so they can live as independently as possible in their own homes and communities. We support people to live life the way they choose.

Our trained caring friendly staff have your Dignity and respect at the forefront of delivering personalised care in the comfort of your own home. When providing home care for yourself or a family member or friend, we take the time to get to know you and make sure you are continually happy with the care you received and the staff that support you.

With Secure Healthcare as your home care service provider, you will enjoy personalised service built around your needs. Secure Healthcare pride ourselves on treating people with the same care, kindness and dignity that we would expect our loved ones to be treated.

We pride ourselves on ensuring  persons needing support are Safe, our care treatment and support helps you to maintain quality of life based on best available evidence, our staff involve and treat you with compassion, kindness, dignity and respect. We ensure our services are responsive to your needs and our management ensure high quality care is provided based on an individuals needs.

Living independently at home is something most of us would like to do for as long as possible. When that time comes to make the decision to ask for extra support to continue to live independently as much as possible, our home care services are tailored for exactly that. If you wish to learn more about how we can support you, please contact us and let one of our advisers come to see you and your family for a more detailed plan on how we can support you.

Depression drains your energy, hope, and drive, making it difficult to do what you need to feel better. But while overcoming depression isn’t quick or easy, it’s far from impossible. You can’t just will yourself to “snap out of it,” but you do have more control than you realise – even if your depression is severe and stubbornly persistent. The key is to start small and build from there. 

Whether you suffer from depression , high level of anxiety or you just don’t quite feel your usual perky self, don’t suffer in silence – there are lots of ways you can increase your positivity and well-being. Depression doesn’t just affect your patients; although we know that can be easy to forget when you’re busy taking care of them (which is pretty much always). The truth is, medical staff, carers and  nurses are just as prone to depression and changes in mood and feelings as anybody else, even if (or perhaps especially because) the majority of that time is spent in the hospital or healthcare establishments.

The anxieties that these jobs can bring on are brought on by many things including:

  • Feeling inadequate or incompetent as a new member of staff.
  • Being reprimanded by a supervisor or manager about something you did or didn’t do.
  • multiple and fast changes in shifts make it difficult to support.
  • Not being able to complete all of your tasks in time.
  • Dealing with a declining patient when you have multiple others to take care of.
  • Dealing with difficult families that are never pleased.
  • Taking care of demanding patients.
  • Bullying within this profession.
  • Being afraid to ask questions.
  • Dealing with difficult doctors.
  • Receiving report on a hard patient.
  • Going to bed and dreading going to work the next day because of a negative environment

Feeling better takes time, but you can get there if you make positive choices for yourself each day.

Rule 1: Reach out and stay connected

When you’re depressed, the tendency is to withdraw and isolate. Even reaching out to close family members and friends can be tough. Compound that with the feelings of shame and the guilt you may feel at neglecting your relationships.

But social support is absolutely essential to depression recovery. Staying connected to other people and the outside world will make a world of difference in your mood and outlook. And if you don’t feel that you have anyone to turn to, it’s never too late to build new friendships and improve your support network.

Six tips for reaching out and staying connected:

Talk to one person about your feelings

Help someone else by volunteering

Have lunch or coffee with a friend

Ask a loved one to check in with you regularly

Go for a walk with a workout buddy

Meet new people by taking a class or joining a club

Rule 2: Do things that make you feel good

In order to overcome depression, you have to do things that relax and energise you. This includes following a healthy lifestyle, learning how to better manage stress, setting limits on what you’re able to do, and scheduling fun activities into your day. While you can’t force yourself to have fun or experience pleasure, you can push yourself to do things, even when you don’t feel like it. You might be surprised at how much better you feel once you’re out in the world. Even if your depression doesn’t lift immediately, you’ll gradually feel more upbeat and energetic as you make time for fun activities.

Aim for eight hours of sleep. Depression typically involves sleep problems; whether you’re sleeping too little or too much, your mood suffers. Get on a better sleep schedule by learning healthy sleep habits. Expose yourself to a little sunlight every day. Lack of sunlight can make depression worse. Take a short walk outdoors, have your coffee outside, enjoy an al fresco meal, people-watch on a park bench, or sit out in the garden. Aim for at least 15 minutes of sunlight a day to boost your mood. If you live somewhere with little winter sunshine, try using a light therapy box. Practice relaxation techniques. A daily relaxation practice can help relieve symptoms of depression, reduce stress, and boost feelings of joy and well-being. Try yoga, deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, or meditation.

Come up with a list of things that you can do for a quick mood boost. The more “tools” for coping with depression, the better. Try and implement a few of these ideas each day, even if you’re feeling good:

  • Spend some time in nature
  • List what you like about yourself
  • Read a good book
  • Watch a funny movie or TV show
  • Take a long, hot bath
  • Take care of a few small tasks
  • Play with a pet
  • Talk to friends or family face-to-face
  • Listen to music
  • Do something spontaneous

Rule 3 : Move vigorously during the day

When you’re depressed, just getting out of bed can seem like a daunting task, let alone working out! But exercise is a powerful depression fighter – and one of the most important tools in your recovery arsenal. Research shows that regular exercise can be as effective as medication for relieving depression symptoms. It also helps prevent relapse once you’re well. To get the most benefit, aim for at least 30 minutes of exercise per day. This doesn’t have to be all at once—and it’s okay to start small. A 10-minute walk can improve your mood for two hours.

 

Your fatigue will improve if you stick with it. Starting to exercise can be difficult when you’re depressed and exhausted. But research shows that your energy levels will improve if you keep with it. You will be less fatigued, not more, once it’s part of your routine. Find exercises that are continuous and rhythmic. The most benefits for depression come from rhythmic exercise- such as walking, weight training, swimming, martial arts, or dancing—where you move both your arms and legs.

Rule 4 : Eat a healthy, mood-boosting diet

What you eat has a direct impact on the way you feel. Reduce your intake of foods that can adversely affect your brain and mood, such as caffeine, alcohol, trans fats, and foods with high levels of chemical preservatives or hormones (such as certain meats).

Don’t skip meals. Going too long between meals can make you feel irritable and tired, so aim to eat something at least every three to four hours.

Minimise sugar and refined carbs. You may crave sugary snacks, baked goods, or comfort foods such as pasta or French fries, but these “feel-good” foods quickly lead to a crash in mood and energy. Aim to cut out as much of these foods as possible.

Boost your B vitamins. Deficiencies in B vitamins such as folic acid and B-12 can trigger depression. To get more, take a B-complex vitamin supplement or eat more citrus fruit, leafy greens, beans, chicken, and eggs.

Rule 5 : Always challenge negative thinking

Do you feel like you’re powerless or weak? That bad things happen and there’s not much you can do about it? That your situation is hopeless? Depression puts a negative spin on everything, including the way you see yourself and your expectations for the future.

When these types of thoughts overwhelm you, it’s important to remind yourself that this is the depression talking. These irrational, pessimistic attitudes—known as cognitive distortions—aren’t realistic. When you really examine them they don’t hold up. But even so, they can be tough to give up. Just telling yourself to “think positive” won’t cut it. Often, they’re part of a lifelong pattern of thinking that’s become so automatic you’re not even completely aware of it. Once you identify the destructive thoughts patterns that you default to, you can start to challenge them with questions such as:

“What’s the evidence that this thought is true? Not true?”

“What would I tell a friend who had this thought?”

“Is there another way of looking at the situation or an alternate explanation?”

“How might I look at this situation if I didn’t have depression?”

As you cross-examine your negative thoughts, you may be surprised at how quickly they crumble. In the process, you’ll develop a more balanced perspective.

Rule 6: know when it’s time to get professional help

If you’ve taken self-help steps and made positive lifestyle changes and still find your depression getting worse, seek professional help. Needing additional help doesn’t mean you’re weak. Sometimes the negative thinking in depression can make you feel like you’re a lost cause, but depression can be treated and you can feel better!

Don’t forget about these self-help tips, though. Even if you’re receiving professional help, these tips can be part of your treatment plan, speeding your recovery and preventing depression from returning.

Rule 7: know when it’s time to move on 

Working in a bad environment , dealing with a bad employer, living with a stressing job could be the main reason why you have depression in the first place, so getting ready to move on , a change of career , profession , or working with a more flexible and friendly employer are just the key to your happiness and improving your depression condition , leaving a job after years of work is challenging but the rewards could be huge if this leads to a better and balanced life.

The Problem

Cavell Nurses’ Trust spoke to over 2,200 nurses, midwives and HCAs about financial hardship and deprivation, domestic abuse, health, illness, wellbeing and employment. Here’s what we found:

  • Nurses are nearly twice as likely as the average person to be unable to afford basic necessities like beds, washing machines and keeping their homes warm
  • Two in five nurses, midwives and healthcare assistants have a long-term physical or mental illness that limits their day-to-day activity
  • Nurses are 3 times more likely to have experienced domestic abuse in the last year

“This is appalling, and we’re taking action”

Will you be here for nurses?

Cavell Nurses’ Trust gives money and support to nurses, midwives and healthcare assistants (HCAs) who are facing financial hardship, often because of illness, domestic abuse and the effects of older age. If you believe we should be here for nurses, please join us and take action at cavellnursestrust.org/research If you’re a nurse, midwife, HCA or work in healthcare, please take action and help your colleagues at cavellnursestrust.org/ research

Still caring

In spite of all this, nursing professionals are getting on with the vital job of caring for the UK. Nurses give so much to us all. They help bring our children into the world. They care for us when we’re dying. They’re here for us with care and compassion at the darkest and the brightest moments in-between.

About Cavell Nurses’ Trust

Cavell Nurses’ Trust is here for nurses, midwives and healthcare assistants (HCAs) with money and support when they are experiencing personal or financial hardship. We also help people who are retired or have changed profession and help students in exceptional situations. We’re proud to offer a listening ear and practical support to everyone who gets in touch. Cavell Nurses’ Trust was established in 1917 following the execution of British nurse Edith Cavell in WW1. She helped 200 Allied soldiers reach freedom from German-occupied Belgium and Cavell Nurses’ Trust is her living legacy. We’re proud to maintain Edith’s values of compassion, courage and care in the work we do. Put simply, we’re #HereForNurses

“I was devastated; the idea that I wouldn’t walk again and be unable

to return to work was horrible. I couldn’t imagine my life without nursing”

In 2010, nurse Michelle’s life changed forever. Until then, she’d worked with new born babies suffering heart problems and loved every minute of it, but increasing pain in her lower back turned into bad news – two ruptured discs. It soon became clear that Michelle would be a wheelchair user for the rest of her life. Michelle’s determination was strong and after five months in hospital and six months rehabilitation, she was ready to return to work. But costly modifications were needed to her wheelchair so Cavell Nurses’ Trust was able to secure funding to convert her manual wheelchair into an electric one. This help has ensured Michelle’s return to work as a Cardiac Education Nurse.

“The help I’ve received from Cavell Nurses’ Trust has been life changing, I will be forever grateful to them.”

A student job in a nursing home opened Louise’s* eyes to a career caring for others and after qualifying in 2005, she nursed in her local hospital. Now a nurse and mother, Louise found her life took a bad turn as her partner was becoming increasingly abusive towards her – physically, emotionally and financially. She ended up in a women’s refuge with a bag of clothes and a toy for each child. Cavell Nurses’ Trust was quickly able to fund items for Louise’s new home and pay her registration costs, allowing her to return to her beloved nursing career.

“I’ve given so much during my nursing career and I’m so grateful to know that Cavell Nurses’ Trust

are there for me if I need help.”

Could this report be a catalyst for making a change?

The money and support Cavell Nurses’ Trust gives must be made available to more and more people. To do this we need to raise awareness of the cause described in this report. We need to raise awareness of the help available. And we need to raise the funds to make it all happen. Cavell Nurses’ Trust can only do this with your support. So I ask you to consider how you, the people you know and the people you work with, could be here for nurses too.

Cavell Nurses’ Trust Trust is  always looking for enthusiastic volunteers to help spread the word about Cavell Nurses’ Trust or work on specific projects. Could you spare a few hours to help them out to support nurses in need?

Cavell Nurses’ Trust is Edith Cavell’s legacy, a charity set up in her name that, nowadays, supports nurses, midwives and healthcare assistants suffering hardship. They provide support for UK nurses, midwives and healthcare assistants, both working and retired, when they’re suffering personal or financial hardship – often because of illness, disability, domestic abuse and the effects of older age. “We’re a charity, and we help people at no cost to them. We give a listening ear and practical support to everyone who asks for help.”

Mya helped out at Cavell Nurses’ Trust offices

“I am currently studying for my A-levels and after that I would like to pursue my dream career of becoming a nurse; this is why I joined the Cavell Nurses’ Trust on my work experience week, in which I have gained office skills and independent research abilities.

“I have enjoyed my time at Cavell Nurses’ Trust, the people are extremely helpful, positive and friendly, and they have welcomed me into their charity, in which I am greatly thankful for.”

Sabrina took part in a bucket collection at Birmingham New Street

“Collecting at Birmingham New Street Station for Cavell Nurses’ Trust was such a brilliant experience it will stay with me forever. I was helping to support nurses, midwives and healthcare assistants in their time of need. This really touched me as I am a student nurse so I really wanted to raise as much money as I possibility could.

“I love volunteering and going the extra mile to raise awareness as I believe everyone can change someone else’s life for the better.

“I’m always being told I am a happy and smiley person but for members of the public to tell me to “keep up the hard work” and “carry on smiling” is really astonishing! I found it surprising that from just a few hours of volunteering my confidence grew so much and I went from an empty bucket to a heavy bucket of donations quite quickly.

“Volunteering is something I would definitely do again. It was such a great experience considering it’s my first time volunteering for Cavell Nurses’ Trust and I received great support and from the team which is amazing.”

Browse through the history of Cavell Nurses’ Trust, from the life of Edith Cavell herself right through to the latest milestones achieved by the charity.

If you are interested in  volunteering opportunities please email : fundraising@cavellnursestrust.org

We’ve become used to hearing stories about how our healthcare professionals, including nurses, are routinely subjected to abuse in the workplace. In most environments, this would not be tolerated but seems to be on the increase in our hospitals, particularly where our A&E departments are concerned.

  • According to Nursing Times, as many as 90% of nurses have experienced violence and verbal abuse while trying to do their job.
  • In 2012, The Telegraph reported that there were some 163 attacks on staff every day and the general consensus is that this situation is no better today.
  • It’s not just a problem that is particular to the UK. A study in America at the turn of the millennium found similar results.
  • The UK, however, currently has one of the highest incidences of violence against nurses in Europe.

But how does abuse affect our healthcare providers and where can they find help and support if they need it?

While the NHS has had a zero-tolerance approach to violence and abusive behaviour since 1999, instances of attacks appear to have remained disappointingly high. Abuse come from a variety of sources including patients and relatives who have mental health problems or simply believe they are not getting the treatment they deserve, as well as those under the influence of alcohol.

Areas such as A&E are at particular risk because of the emergency situations they face, the fact that there is all too often overcrowding and the emotional level many people are operating at when they arrive. While hospitals are under increasing pressure, it’s not just problems with patients and relatives that are at the heart of verbal and physical abuse. The NHS and even private hospitals are not immune from instances of bullying within the workplace.

We expect a lot from our nurses. Often, they’re working long shifts between 12 and 14 hours and managing traumas and medical problems that require urgent attention. We expect them to do this with all the compassion and professionalism they can muster. It’s no wonder that many nurses and other healthcare professionals are revaluating their career choices and deciding whether they want to stay in the profession at all. That goes for people working in a wide range of areas from A&E, the NHS to nursing homes and private care.

While organisations such as the Nursing and Midwifery Council have put in measures to handle instances of verbal or physical abuse in the workplace, there doesn’t seem to have been much change for the better over the last decade or so. The support that nurses get is also still largely piecemeal and varies from trust to trust.

Just like any other group of people, nurses, midwives and healthcare workers need support and can easily find themselves isolated. There’s no doubt that institutions such as the NHS and all the other Nursing Agencies have to do a lot more to protect nurses and other professionals while they are trying to help the people in their care.

The good news is that charitable organisations such as the Cavell Nurses’ Trust have long been providing support for a range of healthcare professionals. Not only do they help when nurses are suffering from hardship and can’t make ends meet, they assist individuals come to terms with illness, life changing experiences and the impact of violence and abuse in the workplace.

We’ve become used to hearing stories about how our healthcare professionals, including nurses, are routinely subjected to abuse in the workplace. In most environments, this would not be tolerated but seems to be on the increase in our hospitals, particularly where our A&E departments are concerned.

  • According to Nursing Times, as many as 90% of nurses have experienced violence and verbal abuse while trying to do their job.
  • In 2012, The Telegraph reported that there were some 163 attacks on staff every day and the general consensus is that this situation is no better today.
  • It’s not just a problem that is particular to the UK. A study in America at the turn of the millennium found similar results.
  • The UK, however, currently has one of the highest incidences of violence against nurses in Europe.

But how does abuse affect our healthcare providers and where can they find help and support if they need it?

While the NHS has had a zero-tolerance approach to violence and abusive behaviour since 1999, instances of attacks appear to have remained disappointingly high. Abuse come from a variety of sources including patients and relatives who have mental health problems or simply believe they are not getting the treatment they deserve, as well as those under the influence of alcohol.

Areas such as A&E are at particular risk because of the emergency situations they face, the fact that there is all too often overcrowding and the emotional level many people are operating at when they arrive. While hospitals are under increasing pressure, it’s not just problems with patients and relatives that are at the heart of verbal and physical abuse. The NHS and even private hospitals are not immune from instances of bullying within the workplace.

We expect a lot from our nurses. Often, they’re working long shifts between 12 and 14 hours and managing traumas and medical problems that require urgent attention. We expect them to do this with all the compassion and professionalism they can muster. It’s no wonder that many nurses and other healthcare professionals are revaluating their career choices and deciding whether they want to stay in the profession at all. That goes for people working in a wide range of areas from A&E, the NHS to nursing homes and private care.

While organisations such as the Nursing and Midwifery Council have put in measures to handle instances of verbal or physical abuse in the workplace, there doesn’t seem to have been much change for the better over the last decade or so. The support that nurses get is also still largely piecemeal and varies from trust to trust.

Just like any other group of people, nurses, midwives and healthcare workers need support and can easily find themselves isolated. There’s no doubt that institutions such as the NHS and all the other Nursing Agencies have to do a lot more to protect nurses and other professionals while they are trying to help the people in their care.

The good news is that charitable organisations such as the Cavell Nurses’ Trust have long been providing support for a range of healthcare professionals. Not only do they help when nurses are suffering from hardship and can’t make ends meet, they assist individuals come to terms with illness, life changing experiences and the impact of violence and abuse in the workplace.

Nursing is Career … Not just a Job

You’re ready for a new job opportunity. Started job search and managed to book yourself an Interview , all is good and as planned, by this point, you need to do your home work to be ready to sell yourself and the best way in doing so is to have a close look at your potential employer’s website.This will help you grow your confidence level and show your future employer you care and want the Job more than the other candidates.

Did you know that you have a chance of asking HR questions before accepting a job offer as a nurse? The widespread shortage of nurses in many places gives you room to be a job seeker with a choice on who to work for. Don’t be timid. Ask questions about what you consider important to you and how you carry out your job. Worth considering the following questions before giving a definite answer :

  1. About salary and allowances

Ask about your starting salary and compare this with what is offered in your area for similar roles .  Inquire about allowances in relation to relocation, overtime and any other special nursing care related duties. Many healthcare agencies fail to guarantee secured working hours for their nurses. A great way to find out is to just ask and check your future employer’s reviews, testimonials and social media accounts.

  1. Job related benefits

What does the company offer for your personal healthcare? This relates to matters such as insurance, paid vacation/leave and maternity leave for women.

  1. Interpersonal relationships

Strive to know the relationship between the administration and the workers.  How easy can you have issues resolved between you and a fellow member of staff or between you and the administration? Does the company have a mentorship program?

  1. Education and Training opportunities

Does the company have a continuing education program that will improve your CV and Overall Career Development ? Opportunities to get certifications in certain areas can help in your professional progression. Many healthcare agencies do offer mandatory training , offer courses and development days to help nurses improve their practice and support their continuing professional development (CPD). It is a great chance to ask your future employer if training is included in your employment contract.

  1. Will your personal special circumstances be considered in your new job role?

This can relate to physical or social-family issues. A pregnant or nursing mother for example may find it challenging to work in certain areas. Such mothers may need a department with more flexibility where it may be possible to take a break or reduce working hours (part time ) when circumstances demand. In addition to talking to the HR officer, talk to nurses and other staff who are already working with the company. You will learn from them some things that HR may not be willing to tell you. All these will help you to decide whether take the job opportunity or not.

If you make it a priority to ask these important questions before you accept a nursing job offer, you’ll be much happier with your decision—whether you accept or decline it. It might seem like a good idea to at first take what you can get, but what you want at the end of the day is to love your job and the best way to achieve this is to do your homework beforehand.

Small things like that can be helpful conversation topics during an interview and, ultimately, they can make all the difference in securing the position. Secure Healthcare Solutions is a specialist in establishment healthcare staffing solutions across England. We are actively recruiting and supplying front line staff in Birmingham and the West Midlands, London, Manchester and Bristol areas.

Tags: homecare – care – agency – nurse – nursing – wolverhampton -westmidlands – birmingham

In addition to recruiting and supplying staff to other home based healthcare providers, Secure Healthcare Solutions provide direct homecare services.

Housekeeping and housing support

House cleaning and all types of cleaning and other home chores can all be covered by a staff from Secure Healthcare Solutions who may do the actual job or arrange for it to be done by the right people. Payment of bills is also part of this service. Those who are still able to pursue hobbies and a social life benefit from the company’s trained assistants.

Personal care

Here the type of care is determined by the disability the patient has. The aim is however, one – to make the patient comfortable and to maintain their dignity. It entails personal hygiene, continence and other elimination matters. It also means making sure that supplies such as catheters, colostomy bags and other things that the patient may need are in stock and of the right quality.

Companionship

People who live alone may not necessarily be incapacitated by their health issues. However, loneliness can be just as bad. A friendly and professional companion from Secure Healthcare Solutions is always available whenever one is needed.

High dependency care

Here the patient needs near intensive care services. The services offered in this category are complicated and specialised. These are patients who may need respiratory support, tube feeding and intravenous medications or fluids. These are patients who may be having spinal or brain injuries. Others may be terminally ill and in need of round the clock palliative care. A skilled nurse from Secure Healthcare Solutions makes sure that such patients receive the best care possible and that all the doctor’s treatment orders are followed. These nurses also know the right questions to ask when necessary.

Live-in care

A person offering care on a continuing basis in a home considers many things. Secure Healthcare Solutions considers interests, hobbies, age and the type of disability of the client so that, the most appropriate staff is released to care for that patient. Where pets are involved, the staff’s attitude towards them is also considered. This guarantees a cordial co-existence between the carer and the client.

Respite care

Care giving can be stressful and with time burnout can result. When the care giver needs to be away for holiday or for other reasons, Secure Healthcare Solutions is ready to step-in and maintain the same care the client is used to.

Medication management

An aged patient, a mentally challenged person or a child can have difficulties in following prescribed drugs instructions. A qualified nurse is there to ascertain compliance and to prevent accidental over or under dosages. The nurse also makes sure that the medicines are kept safely and they are still potent and their expiry date is still far.

Home from hospital

Discharge from hospital can create new challenges for both patient and relatives. A Secure Healthcare Solution nurse makes sure that this transition is as smooth as possible. The nurse will arrange transport home after making all necessary clearance with the hospital. She will also make sure that all necessary equipment is available and will install what is needed by the patient at home. The homecare assistance will be tailored to meet the specific patient’s needs.

As family structure continues to evolve and homecare solutions continue to advance in various ways, people in need of specialised homecare will need more than old fashion type of assistance. The training offered by Secure Healthcare Solutions and the specific and direct homecare services it offers will become even more relevant. This is in view of the important role the company plays in the homebased healthcare industry that no individual carer can consistently match.

 

What are the qualities of a good nurse? The nursing profession is unlike any other in the medical field. Why? A nurse is almost always the medical profession who spends the most time on a one on one basis with the patient. In some cases, a nurse will continue with home visits long after the patient has been discharged from the hospital. For these and many other reasons, a person considering to train as a nurse should do a self-assessment check and determine whether she has what it takes to be a great nurse. Considering the following is a good place to start.

Compassion Toward Others

The ability to ‘feel’ another person’s pain is not a gift that everyone possesses. A good nurse must go being sympathetic to a patient. There must be empathy; fellow-feeling. Doing this for patient after patient and day after day needs determination and a motivation that exceeds the need for mere survival through earning a salary as a nurse.

A Great Team – Player

There are many other people involved in patient care. A great nurse must be ready to maintain harmony in the team. The result of a cohesive team is superior patient care and better outcome.

A Great Nurse is a Permanent Learner

The medical field is a dynamic one. A nurse must continue learning the new trends in nursing care and also have an idea of other advances in medicine. This will not only help her remain at the top of things but will also make her a source of information and inspiration to others.

Level – Headedness

More often than not a nurse is under extreme pressure. Such situations call for decisive action. A great nurse is the one who handles such events with calmness. Panic is the worst thing in an emergency.

The qualities of a great nurse boil down to a caring, compassionate and calm person who can work under pressure without panicking. A great nurse is a source of strength and hope to the sick and a mentor to those following her steps in the profession.

Call on 0121 285 9449 today if you do wish to speak to an adviser – We certainly can help you be a great nurse .