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We understand that there are individuals that have no healthcare experience and are highly passionate about providing care, and also healthcare workers that may have experience of working in care homes or nursing homes that may want a new challenge to work as a home care carer. Working with service users in the comfort of their own home allows you to develop a healthier relationship to provide the best quality care and support. Providing personal care with service users regularly in their home allows you become close with individuals and build trust, which is important to prevent loneliness. Starting your journey as a home carer, requires no experience and full training is provided.

By working in a home care environment, it is a chance to make a difference to lives of people within your community, by providing the best quality support and care. Home care provides you an opportunity to make a difference to improve the routine of peoples lives who need your care and support.

Working in care homes allows you to use transferable skills and apply them effectively within a home care environment to progress your career in the healthcare industry. Providing Healthcare at home is a great opportunity to adapt your skills and allow you to progress your career within care. Through developing healthy relationships with service users, one of the most important skills it develops is, interpersonal skills which is one the most important skills when providing care and support.

Secure Healthcare provides flexible opportunities when working within a home care environment, this gives you the opportunity to do other things around your personal commitments. Within a home care environment service users there will be individuals that require basic care and other individuals may be need more complex care. You may be required to spend a few hours with service users or spend time for longer periods of time.

Duties within a home care environment include:

– Assisting with washing and dressing
– Support with getting patients in and out of bed
– Help with going to the toilet
– Preparing daily meals
– Talking to the patient and providing the individual company
– Support with household tasks
– Helping patients get around the house
– Administering basic medicines

healthcare worker

A domiciliary care role is great way to start your healthcare journey, for this role no healthcare experience is required and full training is provided. It can open up an opportunity to become a care manager, alongside the experience you will need the RMA qualification, NVQ 4, or QCF diploma. To find out more about how to become a care manager click here.

If you looking to start your journey within the healthcare sector with a healthcare agency in the West Midlands, then look no further, as we have care jobs available, if a domiciliary care worker role is of interest to you then apply by clicking here. We have flexible part time and full-time domiciliary roles across Wolverhampton, Cannock and Walsall, offering rewarding salaries and pick up as many shifts as you require around your availability.

Or contact us on 01902 303017 to find out more and secure a role with us today.

As a young adult, you may require some extra support and assistance, while living more independently or it may be that your child is moving from children’s social care to adult’s social care.

We are here to support you or your loved ones and provide care to young adults that require it, whether this is required for a few hours, a few times a week, or full time, we are here to support you. We ensure independence and allow young adults to live an active life.

At Secure Healthcare, we understand that individuals requiring help or support for a loved one, can heavily affect your emotions.

Initially, individuals may feel anxious and nervous or could feel excited and overwhelmed. Overall, it is to improve the quality of life for an individual and it allows you to live a more independent life.

If yourself or your loved one is an adult, seeking support, there is many things that you can do to make life easier. Our healthcare team can support and provide care by assisting with day-to-day tasks, support with arranging appointments, assist with providing medication, support with shopping etc.

Every young individual deserves the chance to achieve their highest potential, which is why we offer short term and long-term care for young adults with complex care needs. We want to make sure that young adults have the opportunity to identify their goals and to feel fully supported every step of the way by our experienced healthcare team.

We know that letting someone new into your home can be a difficult decision and we understand that individual’s needs are going to be different. At Secure Healthcare, we have a person-centred approach which means that our case managers assess individual needs of our service users to find the correct amount of support and care.

There are various conditions that we provide support for:
– Acquired brain injury
– Spinal cord injuries
– Palliative care
– ADHD
– Down syndrome
– Cerebral palsy
– Neurological conditions (MS & MND)
– Stroke & Hypertension
Parkinson’s & Huntington’s
– catheter, bowel & stoma care
– Tracheostomy care
Gastronomy care
– Ventilated patients
– Continence care
– PEG feeding

Supporting Young Adults What you need to know

Our healthcare team are all DBS checked, receive specialist training and have qualifications to ensure the best quality care and support is provided. Our specialist care services are regulated by the care quality commission. We ensure our team receive up to date training and are fully qualified.

When supporting young adults, there is two ways that we can provide care and support. This can be provided in a home care environment or within a care home setting.

Providing care in a personal home care setting has become very popular within society and it allows individuals to be close to their loved ones, around familiar surroundings. Another benefit of home care is that healthcare provided is more flexible, for example it could be provided for a few hours a day or a few times a week. The cost of this care is much lower compared to care within a care home. Home care also allows healthcare teams to build a stronger relationship with individual patients.

In a care home setting, care is generally more full time with individuals that have more serious healthcare conditions. Care in a care home setting is more routine based and you can not be around your loved ones as much.

Whether you require care for yourself or your loved ones within a home care environment or within a care home, find out more about our services by clicking here or contact us on 01902 302017

Over the last 10 years, there has been a major increase for children requiring Complex Care. There has been a 50% increase of individuals requiring Complex Care and there are over 100,000 children and young people that have complex needs.

One of the main reasons for this is because there has been an increase in the number of babies born with complex disabilities.
Caring for a young individual with complex needs can be difficult, particularly because young children are likely to be very needy at a young age, growing up. Young children that have complex needs attend school and it is important the correct support and care are provided around their education.

Here at Secure Healthcare Solutions, we provide complex care for young children, which is person-centered specialist support for young adults that have a long-term health condition, which could be due to a chronic illness, disability, or when discharged from hospital for care or treatment. As a healthcare agency, we understand that a young individual’s care needs are unique, therefore it is vital that we provide tailored care and support to care for these needs.

Complex Care
can be provided within a home environment, as Live-in care which is around-the-clock care in the comfort of your own home. Visiting care is when care is provided on an hourly basis when you require support, it may be for a few hours a day. Respite care is when care is delivered on a short-term basis, as individuals’ loved ones could be busy with other commitments or could be on holiday, also if the individual has been discharged from hospital extra support and care may be required to help you loved ones recover.

Those with a long-term illness or injury will benefit from Complex Care to accommodate towards individual needs. Here at Secure Healthcare Solutions, we have a team of clinical Nurses with years of medical expertise and experience who work collaboratively with case managers to ensure the right level of care is provided

NHS funding for young children that require Complex Care
The NHS provides funding for young individuals that have complex health needs, and qualify for FREE social care which is funded by the NHS, known as NHS continuing healthcare.

Complex Care
Complex Care

Young individuals that require complex care will be assessed by a team of healthcare professionals to assess care needs.
To discover more about Complex Care funding provided by the NHS, click here

There are many Complex Care conditions that we provide care and support for.
Including:
– Acquired brain Injury
– Spinal cord injuries
– Renal care
Palliative care
– Cerebral palsy
– Neurological conditions (MS & MND)
– Stroke & hypertension
– Parkinson’s and Huntington’s
Diabetes care
– Catheter, bowel & stoma care
– Tracheostomy care
– Gastronomy care
– Ventilated patients
Continence care
– PEG feeding
– Tracheostomy care

For those that are seeking Complex Care for yourself or a loved one, find out more about our Complex Care services by clicking here and contact our team on 0121 285 9449.

If you are seeking Complex Care within a care home or at home, Secure Healthcare offers this across the Midlands and Staffordshire.

Find out more about our Complex Care services and if you have any questions or queries, please contact one of the team members who are happy to help.

There is approximately around 15 million people in the UK that have Complex care needs, meaning that they require long term healthcare.

What is Complex Care?
Complex care is a person-centred specialist support service for individuals that have a long-term condition, which could be due to a chronic illness, disability or when discharged from a hospital for care or treatment. At Secure Healthcare Solutions, we understand that every client’s needs and requirements are unique, therefore it is important that we provide tailored care and support to accommodate these needs.

Complex care can be provided within a care home or nursing home setting or within a Homecare setting which is becoming more popular, so individuals are close to their loved ones and are used to their surroundings, care can also be provided in the individual’s own home.

NHS funding for Complex Care
Some individuals with long-term complex health needs qualify for FREE social care arranged and funded solely by the NHS, known as NHS continuing healthcare.
NHS
Individuals requiring complex care will be assessed by a team of healthcare professionals to assess care needs.

Find out more about Complex Care funding by clicking here

Complex care needs managed in a home environment
With technology advancing and if patients are in a reasonable stable condition, it allows individuals to receive homecare within a home environment, close to their loved ones. Care will be provided by, complex carers, who have been specifically trained to deal with the individual needs. Case managers and support workers will work closely with healthcare staff to improve care plans and ensure social support is provided.

Live-in care
Around-the-clock support to individuals in your own home, so that care can be provided whenever you require it. The benefit of a live-in carer is that they will understand complex care needs of individuals and get to know routines. For example, individuals that have had a tracheostomy procedure and require ventilator care are likely to need around the clock care.

Complex Care
Complex Care

Visiting Care
This is when homecare is required on an hourly basis, which allows the individual that requires complex care, choose when and how you need support. This gives the flexibility for carers to pop in once or twice a week or for a few hours a day to provide care and support. This could be to prepare meals, help with housework, assist with washing and dressing and for companionship.

Respite Care
Respite care is delivered on a short-term basis, as an individual’s loved ones may be busy with other commitments, or could be on holiday, and if the individual has come home from hospital, you may require extra support to help your loved ones recover.

Individuals with a long-term illness or injury will benefit from Complex Care to accommodate towards their individual needs. We have a team of clinical Nurses with years of medical expertise and experience who work collaboratively with case managers to ensure the right level of care is in place in the comfort of your own home.

Complex Care Conditions
– Acquired brain Injury
– Spinal cord injuries
– Renal care
– Palliative care
– Cerebral palsy
– Neurological conditions (MS & MND)
– Stroke & hypertension
– Parkinson’s and Huntington’s
– Diabetes care
– Catheter, bowel & stoma care
– Tracheostomy care
– Gastronomy care
– Ventilated patients
– Continence care
– PEG feeding
– Tracheostomy care

If you are seeking Complex Care for yourself or loved one, find out more about our complex care services by clicking here and contact our homecare team on 01902 302017

There are many reasons why we tend to slow down and become more sedentary with age. It may be due to health problems, weight or pain issues, or worries about falling. Or perhaps you think that exercising simply isn’t for you.

But as you grow older, an active lifestyle becomes more important than ever to your health. Getting moving can help boost your energy, maintain your independence, protect your heart, and manage symptoms of illness or pain as well as your weight. And regular exercise is also good for your mind, mood, and memory. No matter your age or your current physical condition, these tips can show you simple, enjoyable ways to become more active and improve your health and outlook.

A recent Swedish study found that physical activity was the number one contributor to longevity, adding extra years to your life—even if you don’t start exercising until your senior years. But getting active is not just about adding years to your life, it’s about adding life to your years. You’ll not only look better when you exercise, you’ll feel sharper, more energetic, and experience a greater sense of well-being.

Remaining active throughout life is a vital part of ageing well. All types of physical activity – from walking and gardening, to dedicated exercise classes – can improve mobility, protect against ill-health, enhance mental well-being and lower the risk of cognitive decline, as well as keep individuals more independent for longer.

The Five Year Forward View, a roadmap outlining how the NHS can remain sustainable while still providing for an ageing population, highlighted the need to encourage healthy lifestyles in people of all ages, to prevent the development of lifestyle related non-communicable diseases. Ensuring older people have opportunities and the motivation to be active is therefore paramount to securing the future of the NHS.

Local authorities, health practitioners and fitness operators all have a role to play in supporting people to be active well into old age: from broad measures ensuring the local community is easily accessible by foot, to providing specifically targeted activity opportunities for older people in collaboration with the physical activity sector.

Active ageing is the process of optimising opportunities for health, participation and security in order to enhance quality of life as people age. It applies to both individuals and population groups.

Active ageing allows people to realise their potential for physical, social, and mental well-being throughout the life course and to participate in society, while providing them with adequate protection, security and care when they need.

The word “active” refers to continuing participation in social, economic, cultural, spiritual and civic affairs, not just the ability to be physically active or to participate in the labour force. Older people who retire from work, ill or live with disabilities can remain active contributors to their families, peers, communities and nations. Active ageing aims to extend healthy life expectancy and quality of life for all people as they age.

“Health” refers to physical, mental and social well being as expressed in the WHO definition of health. Maintaining autonomy and independence for the older people is a key goal in the policy framework for active ageing.

Ageing takes place within the context of friends, work associates, neighbours and family members. This is why interdependence as well as intergenerational solidarity are important tenets of active ageing.

Apart from numerous parks, open spaces and access to Leisure Centres, the West Midlands region offers specific areas of activities targeted at older people such as Mature swimming lessons, Fitness sessions, Age Concern Tai Chi, 50+ activities, bowling , yoga and more.

We have recently teamed up with Wolves Community Trust to bring the fantastic sport of walking football to people in and around Wolverhampton. The aim of walking football is to help older people, or those with limited mobility, remain active and fit, while still pursuing their love for the beautiful game in a fun and sociable environment.

“In the UK around 22% of men die before the age of 65, compared to 13% of women. Although physically active men have a 20 – 30% reduced risk of premature death and 50% less chronic disease, by the age of 55-64 only 32% of men say they take the recommended half hour of exercise five times a week. “

The new sporting craze of ‘Walking Football’ may enable people to continue playing football into their 60s and 70s while reaping a multitude of health benefits, according to Aston University researchers. Walking Football has recently taken the country by storm, becoming one of the fastest growing sports nationwide.

Tips for staying motivated

It’s easy to become discouraged when illness, injury, or changes in the weather interrupt your routine and seem to set you back to square one. But there are ways to stay motivated when life’s challenges get in the way:

Focus on short-term goals, such as improving your mood and energy levels and reducing stress, rather than goals such as weight loss, which can take longer to achieve.

Reward yourself when you successfully complete a workout, reach a new fitness goal, or simply show up on a day when you were tempted to ditch your activity plans. Choose something you look forward to, but don’t allow yourself to do until after exercising, such as having a hot bath or a favorite cup of coffee.

Keep a log. Writing down your activities in an exercise journal not only holds you accountable, but is also a reminder of your accomplishments.

Get support. When you work out with a friend or family member, you can encourage and motivate each other.

What is Hypotention ?

Doctors measure blood pressure using two numbers – the first and higher of the two is called the systolic blood pressure, and it occurs when the heart beats and fills the arteries of the body with blood. The lower number is called the diastolic blood pressure, and it’s the pressure in the heart when it rests between heartbeats. A normal blood pressure is said to be in the region of 120/80mmHg (systolic/diastolic) and doctors spend a lot of time dealing with people with high blood pressure. Use a blood pressure chart to see what your blood pressure means.

Low blood pressure (hypotension) on the other hand often requires no treatment but elderly people in particular can find it a problem, especially when standing up from sitting or lying down. In general terms, the medical advice is that the lower the blood pressure the better, and for most people their blood pressure rarely falls below 90/60.

Recognition

However, low blood pressure can sometimes mean there’s not enough blood flowing to your brain and other vital organs, which can lead to symptoms such as:

What to do if you have symptoms

If you think you may be experiencing an episode of low blood pressure, you should:

  • stop what you’re doing
  • sit or lie down
  • drink some water

The symptoms will usually pass after a few seconds or minutes.

When to see your GP

You should see your GP if you have frequent symptoms of low blood pressure. Your GP can measure your blood pressure and help identify any underlying causes of the problem. Read more about diagnosing low blood pressure.

Low blood pressure after suddenly standing up

If you experience symptoms of low pressure after changing positions, such as standing up, it’s known as postural, or orthostatic, hypotension. Symptoms shouldn’t last longer than a few seconds, as your blood pressure will adjust to your new position. This type of low blood pressure tends to affect people more as they get older, when it can lead to more frequent falls. Similar symptoms may also occur after exercise.

Low blood pressure after eating

If you experience symptoms after eating, it’s known as postprandial hypotension. It occurs more often in older people, particularly in those who have high blood pressure or conditions such as Parkinson’s disease and diabetes mellitus. After a meal, your intestines need a large amount of blood for digestion. If your heart rate doesn’t increase enough to maintain blood pressure, your blood pressure will fall, causing symptoms.

Low blood pressure after standing for long periods

Some people experience symptoms after standing up for long periods of time. This is sometimes known as neutrally mediated hypotension, and most often affects children and young adults.

Read more about the causes of low blood pressure and High blood pressure in the elderly

What is Hypotention ?

Doctors measure blood pressure using two numbers – the first and higher of the two is called the systolic blood pressure, and it occurs when the heart beats and fills the arteries of the body with blood. The lower number is called the diastolic blood pressure, and it’s the pressure in the heart when it rests between heartbeats. A normal blood pressure is said to be in the region of 120/80mmHg (systolic/diastolic) and doctors spend a lot of time dealing with people with high blood pressure. Use a blood pressure chart to see what your blood pressure means.

Low blood pressure (hypotension) on the other hand often requires no treatment but elderly people in particular can find it a problem, especially when standing up from sitting or lying down. In general terms, the medical advice is that the lower the blood pressure the better, and for most people their blood pressure rarely falls below 90/60.

Recognition

However, low blood pressure can sometimes mean there’s not enough blood flowing to your brain and other vital organs, which can lead to symptoms such as:

What to do if you have symptoms

If you think you may be experiencing an episode of low blood pressure, you should:

  • stop what you’re doing
  • sit or lie down
  • drink some water

The symptoms will usually pass after a few seconds or minutes.

When to see your GP

You should see your GP if you have frequent symptoms of low blood pressure. Your GP can measure your blood pressure and help identify any underlying causes of the problem. Read more about diagnosing low blood pressure.

Low blood pressure after suddenly standing up

If you experience symptoms of low pressure after changing positions, such as standing up, it’s known as postural, or orthostatic, hypotension. Symptoms shouldn’t last longer than a few seconds, as your blood pressure will adjust to your new position. This type of low blood pressure tends to affect people more as they get older, when it can lead to more frequent falls. Similar symptoms may also occur after exercise.

Low blood pressure after eating

If you experience symptoms after eating, it’s known as postprandial hypotension. It occurs more often in older people, particularly in those who have high blood pressure or conditions such as Parkinson’s disease and diabetes mellitus. After a meal, your intestines need a large amount of blood for digestion. If your heart rate doesn’t increase enough to maintain blood pressure, your blood pressure will fall, causing symptoms.

Low blood pressure after standing for long periods

Some people experience symptoms after standing up for long periods of time. This is sometimes known as neutrally mediated hypotension, and most often affects children and young adults.

Read more about the causes of low blood pressure and High blood pressure in the elderly

” It’s Dementia Awareness Week and we are standing united with @alzheimerssoc against dementia

#DAW2017 #UniteAgainstDementia ” 

Dementia currently affects around 850,000 people in the UK, with a staggering one in 14 people over the age of 65 living with the condition. To coincide with Dementia Awareness Week, running from 14-20 May, get to know the symptoms and causes of the health condition, along with the treatments and how it can possibly be prevented.

The word ‘dementia’ describes a set of symptoms that may include memory loss and difficulties with thinking, problem-solving or language. These changes are often small to start with, but for someone with dementia they have become severe enough to affect daily life. A person with dementia may also experience changes in their mood or behaviour.

“Everyone, from banks and supermarkets to the local corner shop and hairdresser, share responsibility

for ensuring that people with dementia feel understood, valued and able to contribute to their community.”

What causes dementia?

There are a number of diseases that result in dementia, with the most common cause being Alzheimer’s disease. This is where an abnormal protein surrounds brain cells and another protein damages their internal structure. Over time the chemical connections between brain cells are lost and cells begin to die.

Another common type of dementia is vascular dementia; this occurs when the oxygen supply to the brain is reduced because of narrowing or blockage of blood vessels, leading to brain cells becoming damaged or dying. The symptoms can occur suddenly, following a stroke, or develop over time after a series of small strokes.

What are the symptoms of dementia?

The different types of dementia can affect people in different ways, especially in the early stages. However many of the problems will be cognitive, and a person with dementia will often have problems with some of the following:

Day-to-day memory: Including difficulty remembering events that happened recently.

Concentrating, planning or organising: This could include having difficulty making decisions, solving problems or carrying out tasks.

Language: A person may have trouble following a conversation or finding the right word for what they want to say.

Orientation: They may lose track of the day or date, or become confused about where they are.

Visuospatial skills: This could include problems judging distances and seeing objects in three dimensions.

A person with dementia will also often have changes to their mood. They may become frustrated, irritable, easily upset or unusually sad. The symptoms will gradually get worse over time as dementia is progressive, however how quickly this happens varies from person to person.

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How is dementia diagnosed?

There is no single test for dementia; a diagnosis is based on a combination of factors, including…

Case history: The doctor will talk to the person and someone who knows them well about how their problems developed and how it is affecting their daily life.

Physical examination and tests: Blood tests and other physical examinations will help doctors to rule out any other possible causes for the person’s symptoms.

Mental ability tests: Some tests may be carried out by a doctor or psychologist to assess a patient’s memory and thinking.

A scan of the brain: This can help to confirm a diagnosis and assess which type of dementia a patient has.

Read more about diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease.

What is the treatment for dementia?

There is currently no cure for dementia, however there is ongoing research into how to help symptoms or to slow down their progression. Non-drug treatments available include advice, support and therapies for dementia patients. Talking therapies, cognitive behavioural therapy and cognitive rehabilitation may help some patients, while people with dementia are also encouraged to stay as active as possible – both mentally and physically.

There are some medications available to dementia patients including memantine, a drug that may be offered in the moderate or severe stages of Alzheimer’s disease to help with attention and daily living. Meanwhile people with vascular dementia are likely to be offered drugs to treat the underlying medical conditions that cause dementia, such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure or heart problems.

How can dementia be prevented?

While there is no proven way of preventing dementia, following a healthy and active lifestyle could reduce the risk of developing the condition. This includes maintaining a healthy weight and eating a balanced diet, staying active and avoiding excessive alcohol and smoking, which can lead to narrowing of the arteries. It has also been suggested that staying mentally and socially active into later life may reduce a person’s risk of dementia.

Caring for a loved one with dementia ? 

For more information on dementia visit alzheimers.org.uk. If you think that you or anyone you know may have dementia it is important to visit your GP or talk to one of our care professionals at secure healthcare solutions .

How to Get Involved 

As we get older, there are plenty of challenges to overcome. Mobility can be an issue. Your memory could begin to fade. The things you used to take for granted become more difficult. The development of a health problem or a condition such dementia may mean you need someone to watch out for you.

Most of us want to stay in our own home – it’s not only good for mental and physical wellbeing but allows us to stay connected to our local community, the friends and people we’ve shared our space with for so long.

Dementia and increasing frailty as the years go by naturally leads everyone to evaluate what’s best for the future. Decisions about what to do are usually down to close family members who can be torn between keeping mum or dad in their home and making sure they stay as safe and secure, and happy, as possible.

It’s easy to think there’s no real alternative but to move your loved one into a care home where they can receive professional, around the clock attention. For years, it’s been the traditional way we care for our older relatives. But for many people it’s simply not the right solution.

Live-In Carers

There can be numerous reasons why you don’t want to choose the care home option. Mum or dad may well want to stay in the family home for a start. If they’ve lived in the same location for most of their life, why wouldn’t they want to stay? You might be worried the care homes in your area are not up to the right standard or that they cope with too wide a range of residents and won’t be able to give your loved one the attention they need.

Another option is to hire a live-in carer. This is where a professional carer comes into your home and stays in the spare room, catering to your elderly parent’s needs on a full-time basis. While care homes are staffed with compassionate and caring professionals, they can’t normally give the kind of one to one care that older people need.

With a live-in carer, this is exactly what you get.

At Secure Healthcare Solutions  we know that care isn’t a once size fits all issue. What works for one person, won’t necessarily be suitable for another. We also know that elderly relatives who remain in the familiar surroundings of their home have a better quality of life than those who find themselves uprooted to a care home.

Letting a stranger into your home to look after your mum or dad can be a big decision, of course. Our selection process is quite involved with a care assessment test and face to face interview as well as on the job monitoring. We make sure that all our staff are fully vetted and have a DBS check. Their job is to build a strong, caring relationship, not just with their ward but those around who have an emotional and familial connection. That’s why we take such care on who comes to work for us.

At Secure Healthcare Solutions, we believe t’s not just about having a full-time carer at home. It’s about the right plan tailored for your needs, getting the perfect match and a carer who essentially becomes a part of the family. Yes, they can handle all medical, health and personal needs but they also provide the companionship that so many of us need in later life.

If you wish to learn more about how we can support you, please contact us and let one of our advisers come to see you and your family for a more detailed plan on how we can support you.

Let us help you get the care you need for the life you want.

As we get older, there are plenty of challenges to overcome. Mobility can be an issue. Your memory could begin to fade. The things you used to take for granted become more difficult. The development of a health problem or a condition such dementia may mean you need someone to watch out for you.

Most of us want to stay in our own home – it’s not only good for mental and physical wellbeing but allows us to stay connected to our local community, the friends and people we’ve shared our space with for so long.

Dementia and increasing frailty as the years go by naturally leads everyone to evaluate what’s best for the future. Decisions about what to do are usually down to close family members who can be torn between keeping mum or dad in their home and making sure they stay as safe and secure, and happy, as possible.

It’s easy to think there’s no real alternative but to move your loved one into a care home where they can receive professional, around the clock attention. For years, it’s been the traditional way we care for our older relatives. But for many people it’s simply not the right solution.

Live-In Carers

There can be numerous reasons why you don’t want to choose the care home option. Mum or dad may well want to stay in the family home for a start. If they’ve lived in the same location for most of their life, why wouldn’t they want to stay? You might be worried the care homes in your area are not up to the right standard or that they cope with too wide a range of residents and won’t be able to give your loved one the attention they need.

Another option is to hire a live-in carer. This is where a professional carer comes into your home and stays in the spare room, catering to your elderly parent’s needs on a full-time basis. While care homes are staffed with compassionate and caring professionals, they can’t normally give the kind of one to one care that older people need.

With a live-in carer, this is exactly what you get.

At Secure Healthcare Solutions  we know that care isn’t a once size fits all issue. What works for one person, won’t necessarily be suitable for another. We also know that elderly relatives who remain in the familiar surroundings of their home have a better quality of life than those who find themselves uprooted to a care home.

Letting a stranger into your home to look after your mum or dad can be a big decision, of course. Our selection process is quite involved with a care assessment test and face to face interview as well as on the job monitoring. We make sure that all our staff are fully vetted and have a DBS check. Their job is to build a strong, caring relationship, not just with their ward but those around who have an emotional and familial connection. That’s why we take such care on who comes to work for us.

At Secure Healthcare Solutions, we believe t’s not just about having a full-time carer at home. It’s about the right plan tailored for your needs, getting the perfect match and a carer who essentially becomes a part of the family. Yes, they can handle all medical, health and personal needs but they also provide the companionship that so many of us need in later life.

If you wish to learn more about how we can support you, please contact us and let one of our advisers come to see you and your family for a more detailed plan on how we can support you.

Let us help you get the care you need for the life you want.