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At Secure Healthcare, we are an ever-growing company that provides care and staff built on people. We strive to provide the best quality care and support to individuals across the Midlands and Staffordshire. Every member of our team is a valuable part in our journey to ensure that we achieve this together. We are committed to doing everything we can to help you realise your potential.

The identifying potential is the heart of everything we do. We believe that healthcare workers have the potential to achieve. At Secure you are in the right place, by providing the right support, training and development and career planning, there is potential to progress your career with us.

Within the company, if you are invested and committed, the support is there to make you progress your career with us.

Here at Secure, alongside telling individuals that we value them. We work closely with our staff to ensure they have a clear progression path, with a personalised learning plan to allow our staff achieve their next goal and these plans are constantly updated.

How does Secure Healthcare Solutions support work/life balance?
Our healthcare staff at Secure love their work, and we understand that everyone have their own lives too, Everyone, has their own commitments, such as children care, interests and hobbies and challenges occurring in society. Secure healthcare supports a flexible way to make this happen to create a work life balance. We want individuals to feel comfortable and happy in their personal life and at work.

Staff progression within the company
Here at Secure, over 70% of staff have been promoted internally, we are always providing opportunities with the company. There are always opportunities to get to your next step, whether it is a healthcare role or a role within the office, we are here to support you all the way.

How does Secure reward Staff?
Here at Secure healthcare, we offer competitive salaries to all our staff and pick up a lot of extra shifts to increase annual earnings. We offer flexible working hours to our staff to allow them have a good work life balance, so they can do the things they enjoy. We also have referral schemes, for healthcare staff referred, this allows you to increase your annual earnings.

Training opportunities at Secure Healthcare Solutions
Here at Secure, we heavily invest in training for our staff. We have a clinical team that provides healthcare training and soft skill development to ensure that you are up to date with training, to ensure quality care and support is provided. For example, you may start your journey as a domiciliary carer which requires no care experience, you would just need to be passionate about providing care and progress your career to become a complex carer through training and qualifications that we are able to provided you.
Work at Secure Healthcare
We are a nursing agency in Wolverhampton and we have many healthcare jobs across the Midlands and Staffordshire, offering flexible shifts to suit your availability and we offer high rates of pay. If you are seeking to secure a role within the healthcare industry, then check out our domiciliary roles, HCA, Complex carers and nurse roles local to you within the West Midlands and Staffordshire, using our job search tool or contact us on 0121 285 9449 to find out more. Pick up as many shifts as you want and choose shifts around your availability.

In the UK, as the age of the population increases, the population continues to rise by almost 10 million people in the UK over the next 25 years. With an ageing population, there is a continuous need for healthcare professionals. There are over 15.5 million people aged 60 and over, equivalent to 23% of the UK population. In the UK, the number of “older” old people continues to rise, there are over 3.2 million people aged 80 or over and this is forecasted to double by 2041. If you are passionate about providing care and support, then working in fast paced healthcare role, can be the most satisfying experience and there are great opportunities to progress.

With a care role, there are many challenges that occur and you are working with patients with various healthcare conditions, there will never be a boring day.

Making a difference to people’s lives
With a healthcare role, it is a great way to get to know your community and helping someone in need. If you are a passionate individual, who is helpful, kind and caring and want the opportunity to help those in your own community, then a role in care could be role just for you.

Flexible shifts
You will always be in demand for a healthcare role. Roles are flexible, which means you can pick shifts right for you. Whether you are seeking a full-time position, part time, or extra shifts, there is always shifts available. This is great for a good work life balance and you are in a position to drive your career.

No days are the same
When working within care, there is a variety of environments and individuals that you will work with, whether care is provided within a care home or home care setting. The experience gained over the years will give you transferable skills and knowledge to lead to better opportunities to progress your career.

Great opportunities to progress
Here at Secure Healthcare Solutions, there is a variety of different roles which you could pursue, we have domiciliary care roles in the UK, which require no experience and it only requires a driving licence. With us, there is opportunities to gain qualifications and undertake training to develop your skills to apply in the workplace and to progress your career. For HCA, support worker, complex carer and Registered Nurse roles, 6 months experience is required. We are here to support you every step of the way.

complex carer
complex carer

Roles local to near where you live
As there is a high demand for care jobs, you can secure a role local to where you live. This reduces commute time to a workplace. This prevents you commuting every day and keeps your travels expenses very low.

Meet new people in the community and also healthcare professionals
A care job allows you to meet new people in your community, close to where you live, you are meeting multiple service users and also work collaboratively with a large team of carers and healthcare professionals to network and develop your knowledge and experience to support in progressing your career.

If you are seeking to secure a role within health care industry, then check out our domiciliary roles, HCA, Complex Carers and Nurse roles local to you within the West Midlands and Staffordshire, using our job search tool or contact us on 0121 285 9449 to find out more. Pick up as many shifts as you want and choose shifts around your availability.

Statistics reported by the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) outline that young people aged 18-34 are most likely to apply to a care job, 64% and over half the people this age are open to changing their jobs to start a career in adult social care. At Secure Healthcare we understand that young individuals do not have any experience at a young age, which is why we have opportunities for individuals to start their careers with no experience.

For a healthcare role you have to be passionate about providing care and at times it can be very challenging, there may be problems that you have to solve at times.

A care job is varied, every day is fairly different and it involves you being on your feet a lot, compared to an office job which is very desk based. A career in care is about making a difference to people’s lives and there are opportunities to progress.

For an individual that has no experience, and if you are passionate about providing care, then starting your career as domiciliary carer is the best option.

Domiciliary care is when a carer visits the service user’s home to provide care and support in the comfort of their own home. With home care it may be for short periods of time, from one-two hours, several hours or 24-hour care. Providing home care services allows individuals to feel independent to allow them to live a quality life.

For a domiciliary carer, some of the day-to-day responsibilities include:
– Providing personal care such as washing and dressing
– Supporting patients to get in and out of bed
– Assistance with going to the toilet
– Help with preparing with daily meals
– Communicating with service users to provide the patient company
– Assisting with household tasks
– Aid with helping patients get around the house

(A domiciliary care role requires access to a vehicle)

Career
Career

A domiciliary care role is a great way to start your healthcare journey and it can open up an opportunity to become a care manager, alongside the experience, you will require an RMA qualification, NVQ 4, or QCF diploma. Click here to find out more.

If you are young individual that has 6 months care experience, but are seeking new opportunities, then a healthcare assistant could be the role that you are looking for.

When you have gained domiciliary experience and through our internal training and further qualifications, you have the opportunity to become a healthcare assistant, which is when care is generally provided more in care homes. When progressing to healthcare assistant roles, there is opportunities to become a complex carer within a home care setting or within a care home, through our internal training and development opportunities.

As a young individual, if you are seeking to start your journey within health care, then check out our domiciliary roles and HCA roles local to you within the West Midlands and Staffordshire, using our job search tool or contact us on 0121 285 9449 to find out more. Pick up as many shifts as you want and choose shifts around your availability.

Working as a healthcare assistant, the role is generally varied and can include working alongside Nurses in care homes, hospitals or within GP’s.
If you are considering a career in care, then becoming an HCA could be the role for you to specialise.

For a HCA role, there is no set requirements, however there is certain skills and personal characteristics that you must have for you to pursue this career option.
– You need to be patient and have the ability to remain calm in stressful situations
– Have a caring and friendly personality
– For this role stamina and endurance is required, as there is a lot movement involved
– Great communication skills to use effectively with service users and great listening skills
– Ability to work well with others, this includes service users, healthcare professionals and with family members
– Excellent written and spoken English skills are required
– Willing to undertake personal care (washing, assisting with toilet etc.)

Working as HCA has many responsibilities, these could be regular routine responsibilities and can also change depending on the clients needs, you need to have the ability to adapt to certain situations.

As a healthcare assistant, you will be providing care and support to those in need:
– Washing and dressing patients if required
– Serving and assisting with food preparation to feed patients
– Assistance with movement around the house
– Making and changing beds
– Assistance with toileting
– Taking and recording basic interventions such as blood pressure, temperature and finger prick testing, weight etc.
– Listening and talking with patients
– Sterilising equipment
– Keeping supplies and equipment in order
– Administering basic medicine and bandaging wounds if required. For this, HCA’s will be provided training to apply this
to service users

Healthcare Assistant
Healthcare Assistant

How Secure Healthcare could help?
Here at Secure Healthcare Solutions, we require 6 months experience and we provide full training to allow you to gain skills and knowledge to support service users. Our services are regulated by the CQC.

We will not throw you in the deep end, we can arrange shadow shifts to be completed. This is where, you will shadow a senior member of the team, allowing you to get hands on experience, gain confidence and understand the role. This is a great opportunity for you to ask any questions.

For our healthcare assistants, we provide ongoing support, through training and qualifications, we also supervise and carry out spot checks to identify any potential training needs.

At Secure Healthcare, you can choose when you want to work, so if you require full-time hours, part time or extra shifts alongside your regular job, then a flexible role could be just for you.

Secure Healthcare is always hiring health care assistants across the West Midlands and Staffordshire. We are always seeking highly passionate health care workers to join our care team. If you believe, you have the right skills and characteristics, or want to find out more about the benefits of working for Secure Healthcare.

Sobia’s experience of working as a healthcare assistant

Sobia’s experience of working as a healthcare assistant at Secure Healthcare.

“For a healthcare assistant role, you have to have a strong character and be passionate about providing care. Working as a carer is not an easy ride, there is daily responsibilities based on individual client needs, however there is unexpected challenges that arise over the course of providing care”.

We have healthcare jobs across the Midlands & Staffordshire, whether you are seeking part time, full time or the odd shifts around your availability, then discover the latest roles using our job search tool or contact our recruitment team on 0121 285 9449.

The Problem

Cavell Nurses’ Trust spoke to over 2,200 nurses, midwives and HCAs about financial hardship and deprivation, domestic abuse, health, illness, wellbeing and employment. Here’s what we found:

  • Nurses are nearly twice as likely as the average person to be unable to afford basic necessities like beds, washing machines and keeping their homes warm
  • Two in five nurses, midwives and healthcare assistants have a long-term physical or mental illness that limits their day-to-day activity
  • Nurses are 3 times more likely to have experienced domestic abuse in the last year

“This is appalling, and we’re taking action”

Will you be here for nurses?

Cavell Nurses’ Trust gives money and support to nurses, midwives and healthcare assistants (HCAs) who are facing financial hardship, often because of illness, domestic abuse and the effects of older age. If you believe we should be here for nurses, please join us and take action at cavellnursestrust.org/research If you’re a nurse, midwife, HCA or work in healthcare, please take action and help your colleagues at cavellnursestrust.org/ research

Still caring

In spite of all this, nursing professionals are getting on with the vital job of caring for the UK. Nurses give so much to us all. They help bring our children into the world. They care for us when we’re dying. They’re here for us with care and compassion at the darkest and the brightest moments in-between.

About Cavell Nurses’ Trust

Cavell Nurses’ Trust is here for nurses, midwives and healthcare assistants (HCAs) with money and support when they are experiencing personal or financial hardship. We also help people who are retired or have changed profession and help students in exceptional situations. We’re proud to offer a listening ear and practical support to everyone who gets in touch. Cavell Nurses’ Trust was established in 1917 following the execution of British nurse Edith Cavell in WW1. She helped 200 Allied soldiers reach freedom from German-occupied Belgium and Cavell Nurses’ Trust is her living legacy. We’re proud to maintain Edith’s values of compassion, courage and care in the work we do. Put simply, we’re #HereForNurses

“I was devastated; the idea that I wouldn’t walk again and be unable

to return to work was horrible. I couldn’t imagine my life without nursing”

In 2010, nurse Michelle’s life changed forever. Until then, she’d worked with new born babies suffering heart problems and loved every minute of it, but increasing pain in her lower back turned into bad news – two ruptured discs. It soon became clear that Michelle would be a wheelchair user for the rest of her life. Michelle’s determination was strong and after five months in hospital and six months rehabilitation, she was ready to return to work. But costly modifications were needed to her wheelchair so Cavell Nurses’ Trust was able to secure funding to convert her manual wheelchair into an electric one. This help has ensured Michelle’s return to work as a Cardiac Education Nurse.

“The help I’ve received from Cavell Nurses’ Trust has been life changing, I will be forever grateful to them.”

A student job in a nursing home opened Louise’s* eyes to a career caring for others and after qualifying in 2005, she nursed in her local hospital. Now a nurse and mother, Louise found her life took a bad turn as her partner was becoming increasingly abusive towards her – physically, emotionally and financially. She ended up in a women’s refuge with a bag of clothes and a toy for each child. Cavell Nurses’ Trust was quickly able to fund items for Louise’s new home and pay her registration costs, allowing her to return to her beloved nursing career.

“I’ve given so much during my nursing career and I’m so grateful to know that Cavell Nurses’ Trust

are there for me if I need help.”

Could this report be a catalyst for making a change?

The money and support Cavell Nurses’ Trust gives must be made available to more and more people. To do this we need to raise awareness of the cause described in this report. We need to raise awareness of the help available. And we need to raise the funds to make it all happen. Cavell Nurses’ Trust can only do this with your support. So I ask you to consider how you, the people you know and the people you work with, could be here for nurses too.

What is Hypotention ?

Doctors measure blood pressure using two numbers – the first and higher of the two is called the systolic blood pressure, and it occurs when the heart beats and fills the arteries of the body with blood. The lower number is called the diastolic blood pressure, and it’s the pressure in the heart when it rests between heartbeats. A normal blood pressure is said to be in the region of 120/80mmHg (systolic/diastolic) and doctors spend a lot of time dealing with people with high blood pressure. Use a blood pressure chart to see what your blood pressure means.

Low blood pressure (hypotension) on the other hand often requires no treatment but elderly people in particular can find it a problem, especially when standing up from sitting or lying down. In general terms, the medical advice is that the lower the blood pressure the better, and for most people their blood pressure rarely falls below 90/60.

Recognition

However, low blood pressure can sometimes mean there’s not enough blood flowing to your brain and other vital organs, which can lead to symptoms such as:

What to do if you have symptoms

If you think you may be experiencing an episode of low blood pressure, you should:

  • stop what you’re doing
  • sit or lie down
  • drink some water

The symptoms will usually pass after a few seconds or minutes.

When to see your GP

You should see your GP if you have frequent symptoms of low blood pressure. Your GP can measure your blood pressure and help identify any underlying causes of the problem. Read more about diagnosing low blood pressure.

Low blood pressure after suddenly standing up

If you experience symptoms of low pressure after changing positions, such as standing up, it’s known as postural, or orthostatic, hypotension. Symptoms shouldn’t last longer than a few seconds, as your blood pressure will adjust to your new position. This type of low blood pressure tends to affect people more as they get older, when it can lead to more frequent falls. Similar symptoms may also occur after exercise.

Low blood pressure after eating

If you experience symptoms after eating, it’s known as postprandial hypotension. It occurs more often in older people, particularly in those who have high blood pressure or conditions such as Parkinson’s disease and diabetes mellitus. After a meal, your intestines need a large amount of blood for digestion. If your heart rate doesn’t increase enough to maintain blood pressure, your blood pressure will fall, causing symptoms.

Low blood pressure after standing for long periods

Some people experience symptoms after standing up for long periods of time. This is sometimes known as neutrally mediated hypotension, and most often affects children and young adults.

Read more about the causes of low blood pressure and High blood pressure in the elderly

What is Hypotention ?

Doctors measure blood pressure using two numbers – the first and higher of the two is called the systolic blood pressure, and it occurs when the heart beats and fills the arteries of the body with blood. The lower number is called the diastolic blood pressure, and it’s the pressure in the heart when it rests between heartbeats. A normal blood pressure is said to be in the region of 120/80mmHg (systolic/diastolic) and doctors spend a lot of time dealing with people with high blood pressure. Use a blood pressure chart to see what your blood pressure means.

Low blood pressure (hypotension) on the other hand often requires no treatment but elderly people in particular can find it a problem, especially when standing up from sitting or lying down. In general terms, the medical advice is that the lower the blood pressure the better, and for most people their blood pressure rarely falls below 90/60.

Recognition

However, low blood pressure can sometimes mean there’s not enough blood flowing to your brain and other vital organs, which can lead to symptoms such as:

What to do if you have symptoms

If you think you may be experiencing an episode of low blood pressure, you should:

  • stop what you’re doing
  • sit or lie down
  • drink some water

The symptoms will usually pass after a few seconds or minutes.

When to see your GP

You should see your GP if you have frequent symptoms of low blood pressure. Your GP can measure your blood pressure and help identify any underlying causes of the problem. Read more about diagnosing low blood pressure.

Low blood pressure after suddenly standing up

If you experience symptoms of low pressure after changing positions, such as standing up, it’s known as postural, or orthostatic, hypotension. Symptoms shouldn’t last longer than a few seconds, as your blood pressure will adjust to your new position. This type of low blood pressure tends to affect people more as they get older, when it can lead to more frequent falls. Similar symptoms may also occur after exercise.

Low blood pressure after eating

If you experience symptoms after eating, it’s known as postprandial hypotension. It occurs more often in older people, particularly in those who have high blood pressure or conditions such as Parkinson’s disease and diabetes mellitus. After a meal, your intestines need a large amount of blood for digestion. If your heart rate doesn’t increase enough to maintain blood pressure, your blood pressure will fall, causing symptoms.

Low blood pressure after standing for long periods

Some people experience symptoms after standing up for long periods of time. This is sometimes known as neutrally mediated hypotension, and most often affects children and young adults.

Read more about the causes of low blood pressure and High blood pressure in the elderly

Are you a Health Care Assistant in the Birmingham area who has a passion for care? If the answer is yes, then Secure Healthcare could be the right option for you!

Visit our open day to find out more about the new roles we have to offer (temp and perm).

We specialise in supplying Health Care Assistants to Nursing Homes, Residential homes, NHS hospitals, Mental health hospitals and the community across the UK. Secure Healthcare is never short of a variety of hours to cover and so has a shift to suit every worker.

Our business operates 24 hours a day 7 days a week and ensures we give you constant and regular work on a daily, weekly and long term basis, we build strong relationships with our personnel which allows us to make your work with us hassle free.

This enables you the ability to specify your own work availability each week and be allocated the shifts that suit your lifestyle and commitments….

This is only one of the outstanding benefits of working with Secure Healthcare.
We offer many exciting and unique prospects such as;
• Excellent pay rates
• Free and easy to use online training updates
• Weekly Payment
• 24/7 on-call support team
• Bonus Schemes

Secure Your Career with Secure Healthcare Solutions Today.

To Book you place please call us on 0121 285 9449 or contact Vidas Savickas by Email if you would like more information using cv@securehealthcaresolutions.co.uk

Registering with us shall require you to provide two professional references. One of which is to be either your current or most recent employer. It is also necessary for an enhanced DBS disclosure to be carried out.

Applicants must also have at least six months care experience in the past 2 years.

We look forward to welcoming you soon ?

Last year’s report by Skills for Care on the state of the adult social care sector and workforce in England estimated that just under 340,000 social care employees leave their jobs each year. On average, in care homes there are about 2,800 unfilled manager jobs at any one time while, despite concerted recruitment drives, vacancy rates for social workers in the statutory sector have jumped from 7.3% in 2012 to 11% in 2016, and turnover rates continue to climb.

Sharon Allen, chief executive of Skills for Care, says: “Recruitment and retention is without a doubt the biggest issue for adult social care employers because to have sufficient [levels] of the right people with the right skills is absolutely fundamental to providing quality care and support. It is a big concern for everybody and we’re trying to help promote careers in social care … but there are many challenges.”

With 80% of all jobs in adult social care held by women, something is clearly making women want to leave the sector. And the problems are not just confined to social care. In the NHS, figures from NHS Employers show that 77% of the workforce is female. There are currently 24,000 nursing vacancies (including in social care), according to the Royal College of Nursing (RCN).

In community health nursing, there has been a 12% drop overall in full-time equivalent staffing numbers since September 2009, despite growing demand.

In the East Midlands, district nurse Mary Black says her team and other colleagues are struggling to cope, because of a mixture of unfilled vacancies, maternity leave and long-term sickness absence, which directly affect patient care. “We firefight every single day: moving patient visits, ringing round to see if other teams can help, and we often have to cancel or defer. We have bank and agency nurses to cover vacancies, but not usually sickness or maternity leave, so it means the staff who are left have lots more visits to do each day,” she says. “There is no continuity, as often there’s a different agency nurse each day and there are a lot of duties and patient visits that an agency nurse can’t do, so the complex patients fall to our permanent members of the team. Agency staff often cancel at the last minute and sometimes don’t turn up.”

Black says: “It often feels like we’re not giving our patients a very good service, we cannot spend the time with them that they often need. Incidents and complaints will have risen.”

Rob Davies, a senior physiotherapist at a large hospital in the south-west, which he asked not to be named, says it struggles to attract recruits from further afield. For the last eight months, there have been 12.5 full-time equivalent vacancies for junior physiotherapists and two for senior specialist ones. With major trauma status, and a busy outpatient unit, an overnight and weekend service, the 140 members of the physiotherapy team are swamped, even when they have a full roster of staff. Stress is now the biggest cause of workplace sickness, he says. “[Staff shortages] affect everything from how you manage the caseload, and what you can do for patients, and it contributes to staff stress. It affects morale. I’m surprised that more of us in our department don’t go off sick.

“When you don’t have the right staff levels, we have to see patients on a prioritised basis,” he says. “Patients don’t get the quality and sometimes it means people get sub-optimal outcomes. It’s frustrating and demoralising.” Some of his colleagues have voted with their feet: leaving for private sector jobs with better work-life balance, or moving somewhere with lower house prices. “They are on the same money as it’s nationally done but the property prices are different,” Davies says. In the South-West, the shortages are particularly acute for more junior grades. “It tends to be easier to recruit more senior physios as they are a band up so the pay is better but it still can be an issue getting the right people down to us.”

Last month’s report on the public sector workforce by the Reform thinktank is blunt about the impact of staffing problems. “Public services fail when employees fail,” it concludes. “This is the dramatic lesson from a number of high-profile errors in recent public service delivery. In many instances, quality is compromised, not because of individual incompetence, but the way the workforce is structured and organised.”

With potentially fewer candidates from the EU and more existing staff retiring, it will be crucial for the NHS and social care sectors to attract younger people. Allen says that there is already close working with schools and job centres to promote social care as a career and adult social care has had “phenomenal success” with apprenticeships, although the government’s levy on large employers to help fund apprenticeships could risk this success. “There’s more we can do to promote social care as a really great career for young people,” says Allen. “It’s not just about getting people in, it’s about keeping them.”