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What is Hypotention ?

Doctors measure blood pressure using two numbers – the first and higher of the two is called the systolic blood pressure, and it occurs when the heart beats and fills the arteries of the body with blood. The lower number is called the diastolic blood pressure, and it’s the pressure in the heart when it rests between heartbeats. A normal blood pressure is said to be in the region of 120/80mmHg (systolic/diastolic) and doctors spend a lot of time dealing with people with high blood pressure. Use a blood pressure chart to see what your blood pressure means.

Low blood pressure (hypotension) on the other hand often requires no treatment but elderly people in particular can find it a problem, especially when standing up from sitting or lying down. In general terms, the medical advice is that the lower the blood pressure the better, and for most people their blood pressure rarely falls below 90/60.

Recognition

However, low blood pressure can sometimes mean there’s not enough blood flowing to your brain and other vital organs, which can lead to symptoms such as:

What to do if you have symptoms

If you think you may be experiencing an episode of low blood pressure, you should:

  • stop what you’re doing
  • sit or lie down
  • drink some water

The symptoms will usually pass after a few seconds or minutes.

When to see your GP

You should see your GP if you have frequent symptoms of low blood pressure. Your GP can measure your blood pressure and help identify any underlying causes of the problem. Read more about diagnosing low blood pressure.

Low blood pressure after suddenly standing up

If you experience symptoms of low pressure after changing positions, such as standing up, it’s known as postural, or orthostatic, hypotension. Symptoms shouldn’t last longer than a few seconds, as your blood pressure will adjust to your new position. This type of low blood pressure tends to affect people more as they get older, when it can lead to more frequent falls. Similar symptoms may also occur after exercise.

Low blood pressure after eating

If you experience symptoms after eating, it’s known as postprandial hypotension. It occurs more often in older people, particularly in those who have high blood pressure or conditions such as Parkinson’s disease and diabetes mellitus. After a meal, your intestines need a large amount of blood for digestion. If your heart rate doesn’t increase enough to maintain blood pressure, your blood pressure will fall, causing symptoms.

Low blood pressure after standing for long periods

Some people experience symptoms after standing up for long periods of time. This is sometimes known as neutrally mediated hypotension, and most often affects children and young adults.

Read more about the causes of low blood pressure and High blood pressure in the elderly

What is Hypotention ?

Doctors measure blood pressure using two numbers – the first and higher of the two is called the systolic blood pressure, and it occurs when the heart beats and fills the arteries of the body with blood. The lower number is called the diastolic blood pressure, and it’s the pressure in the heart when it rests between heartbeats. A normal blood pressure is said to be in the region of 120/80mmHg (systolic/diastolic) and doctors spend a lot of time dealing with people with high blood pressure. Use a blood pressure chart to see what your blood pressure means.

Low blood pressure (hypotension) on the other hand often requires no treatment but elderly people in particular can find it a problem, especially when standing up from sitting or lying down. In general terms, the medical advice is that the lower the blood pressure the better, and for most people their blood pressure rarely falls below 90/60.

Recognition

However, low blood pressure can sometimes mean there’s not enough blood flowing to your brain and other vital organs, which can lead to symptoms such as:

What to do if you have symptoms

If you think you may be experiencing an episode of low blood pressure, you should:

  • stop what you’re doing
  • sit or lie down
  • drink some water

The symptoms will usually pass after a few seconds or minutes.

When to see your GP

You should see your GP if you have frequent symptoms of low blood pressure. Your GP can measure your blood pressure and help identify any underlying causes of the problem. Read more about diagnosing low blood pressure.

Low blood pressure after suddenly standing up

If you experience symptoms of low pressure after changing positions, such as standing up, it’s known as postural, or orthostatic, hypotension. Symptoms shouldn’t last longer than a few seconds, as your blood pressure will adjust to your new position. This type of low blood pressure tends to affect people more as they get older, when it can lead to more frequent falls. Similar symptoms may also occur after exercise.

Low blood pressure after eating

If you experience symptoms after eating, it’s known as postprandial hypotension. It occurs more often in older people, particularly in those who have high blood pressure or conditions such as Parkinson’s disease and diabetes mellitus. After a meal, your intestines need a large amount of blood for digestion. If your heart rate doesn’t increase enough to maintain blood pressure, your blood pressure will fall, causing symptoms.

Low blood pressure after standing for long periods

Some people experience symptoms after standing up for long periods of time. This is sometimes known as neutrally mediated hypotension, and most often affects children and young adults.

Read more about the causes of low blood pressure and High blood pressure in the elderly

Most of us welcome hot weather, but when it’s too hot for too long there are health risks. If a heatwave hits this summer, make sure the hot weather doesn’t harm you or anyone you know. Older people are at high risk for developing heated-related illness because the ability to respond to summer heat can become less efficient with advancing years. Fortunately, the summer can remain safe and enjoyable for everyone who uses good, sound judgement.

Heat stress, heat fatigue, heat syncope (sudden dizziness after exercising in the heat, heat cramps and heat exhaustion are all forms of “hyperthermia,” the general name given to a variety of heat-related illnesses. Symptoms may include headache, nausea, muscle spasms and fatigue after exposure to heat. If you suspect someone is suffering from a heat-related illness:

  • Get the victim out of the sun and into a cool place, preferably one that is air-conditioned.
  • Offer fluids but avoid alcohol and caffeine. Water, fruit and vegetable juices are best.
  • Encourage the individual to shower, bathe or sponge off with cool water.
  • Urge the person to lie down and rest, preferably in a cool place.

Heat stroke is especially dangerous for older people and requires emergency medical attention. A person with heat stroke has a body temperature above 40 and may have symptoms such as confusion, combativeness, bizarre behavior, faintness, staggering, strong rapid pulse, dry flushed skin, lack of sweating, possible delirium or coma.

The temperature does not have to hit 38 for a person to be at risk for hyperthermia. Both an individual’s general health and/or lifestyle may increase the threat of a heat-related illness. Health factors which may increase risk include:

  • Age-related changes to the skin such as poor blood circulation and inefficient sweat glands.
  • Heart, lung and kidney diseases, as well as any illness that causes general weakness or fever.
  • High blood pressure or other conditions that require changes in diet. For example, people on salt restricted diets may increase their risk. However, salt pills should not be used without first asking a consulting doctor.
  • The inability to perspire caused by medications including diuretics, sedatives, tranquilizers and certain heart and blood pressure drugs.
  • Taking several drugs for various conditions. It is important, however, to continue to take prescribed medication and discuss possible problems with a physician.
  • Being substantially overweight or underweight.
  • Drinking alcoholic beverages.

Lifestyle factors also can increase risk, including extremely hot living quarters, lack of transportation, overdressing, visiting overcrowded places and not understanding weather conditions. Older people, particularly those at special risk, should stay indoors on especially hot and humid days, particularly when there is an air pollution alert in effect. People without fans or air conditioners should go to shopping malls, movie houses and libraries. Friends or relatives might be asked to supply transportation on particularly hot days. Many communities, charities, networking groups,  religious groups and senior citizen centres also provide such services as cooling centres.

Seek help from a GP or contact NHS 111 if someone is feeling unwell and shows symptoms of:

  • breathlessness
  • chest pain
  • confusion
  • intense thirst
  • weakness
  • dizziness
  • cramps which get worse or don’t go away

 

 

 

The brains of SuperAgers (those 80 years old and older whose memories are as sharp as healthy people in their 50s and 60s) shrink much slower than their age-matched peers, resulting in a greater resistance to ‘typical’ memory loss and dementia, a new path-breaking study that shows.

This is a MRI scan of a SuperAger’s brain. The portion between the yellow and red lines is the cortex, which contains neurons. SuperAgers’ cortices shrunk over two times slower than average-age peers’ in a recent Northwestern Medicine study, which may contribute to their superior memory performance.

Credit: Northwestern University

The highly engaged and delightful conversationalist, who reads, volunteers and routinely researches questions on the Internet, is part of a new path-breaking Northwestern Medicine study that shows that SuperAgers’ brains shrink much slower than their age-matched peers, resulting in a greater resistance to “typical” memory loss and dementia.

Over the course of the 18-month study, normal agers lost volume in the cortex twice as fast as SuperAgers, a rare group of people aged 80 and above whose memories are as sharp as those of healthy persons decades younger.

“Increasing age is often accompanied by ‘typical’ cognitive decline or, in some cases, more severe cognitive decline called dementia,” said first author Amanda Cook, a clinical neuropsychology doctoral student in the laboratory of Emily Rogalski and Sandra Weintraub. “SuperAgers suggest that age-related cognitive decline is not inevitable.”The study was published in JAMA. Senior author Emily Rogalski will present the findings at the 2017 Cognitive Aging Summit in Bethesda, Maryland, April 6.SuperAger research at Northwestern is flipping the traditional approach to Alzheimer’s research of focusing on brains that are underperforming to instead focusing on outperforming brains.

” It’s Dementia Awareness Week and we are standing united with @alzheimerssoc against dementia

#DAW2017 #UniteAgainstDementia ” 

Dementia currently affects around 850,000 people in the UK, with a staggering one in 14 people over the age of 65 living with the condition. To coincide with Dementia Awareness Week, running from 14-20 May, get to know the symptoms and causes of the health condition, along with the treatments and how it can possibly be prevented.

The word ‘dementia’ describes a set of symptoms that may include memory loss and difficulties with thinking, problem-solving or language. These changes are often small to start with, but for someone with dementia they have become severe enough to affect daily life. A person with dementia may also experience changes in their mood or behaviour.

“Everyone, from banks and supermarkets to the local corner shop and hairdresser, share responsibility

for ensuring that people with dementia feel understood, valued and able to contribute to their community.”

What causes dementia?

There are a number of diseases that result in dementia, with the most common cause being Alzheimer’s disease. This is where an abnormal protein surrounds brain cells and another protein damages their internal structure. Over time the chemical connections between brain cells are lost and cells begin to die.

Another common type of dementia is vascular dementia; this occurs when the oxygen supply to the brain is reduced because of narrowing or blockage of blood vessels, leading to brain cells becoming damaged or dying. The symptoms can occur suddenly, following a stroke, or develop over time after a series of small strokes.

What are the symptoms of dementia?

The different types of dementia can affect people in different ways, especially in the early stages. However many of the problems will be cognitive, and a person with dementia will often have problems with some of the following:

Day-to-day memory: Including difficulty remembering events that happened recently.

Concentrating, planning or organising: This could include having difficulty making decisions, solving problems or carrying out tasks.

Language: A person may have trouble following a conversation or finding the right word for what they want to say.

Orientation: They may lose track of the day or date, or become confused about where they are.

Visuospatial skills: This could include problems judging distances and seeing objects in three dimensions.

A person with dementia will also often have changes to their mood. They may become frustrated, irritable, easily upset or unusually sad. The symptoms will gradually get worse over time as dementia is progressive, however how quickly this happens varies from person to person.

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How is dementia diagnosed?

There is no single test for dementia; a diagnosis is based on a combination of factors, including…

Case history: The doctor will talk to the person and someone who knows them well about how their problems developed and how it is affecting their daily life.

Physical examination and tests: Blood tests and other physical examinations will help doctors to rule out any other possible causes for the person’s symptoms.

Mental ability tests: Some tests may be carried out by a doctor or psychologist to assess a patient’s memory and thinking.

A scan of the brain: This can help to confirm a diagnosis and assess which type of dementia a patient has.

Read more about diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease.

What is the treatment for dementia?

There is currently no cure for dementia, however there is ongoing research into how to help symptoms or to slow down their progression. Non-drug treatments available include advice, support and therapies for dementia patients. Talking therapies, cognitive behavioural therapy and cognitive rehabilitation may help some patients, while people with dementia are also encouraged to stay as active as possible – both mentally and physically.

There are some medications available to dementia patients including memantine, a drug that may be offered in the moderate or severe stages of Alzheimer’s disease to help with attention and daily living. Meanwhile people with vascular dementia are likely to be offered drugs to treat the underlying medical conditions that cause dementia, such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure or heart problems.

How can dementia be prevented?

While there is no proven way of preventing dementia, following a healthy and active lifestyle could reduce the risk of developing the condition. This includes maintaining a healthy weight and eating a balanced diet, staying active and avoiding excessive alcohol and smoking, which can lead to narrowing of the arteries. It has also been suggested that staying mentally and socially active into later life may reduce a person’s risk of dementia.

Caring for a loved one with dementia ? 

For more information on dementia visit alzheimers.org.uk. If you think that you or anyone you know may have dementia it is important to visit your GP or talk to one of our care professionals at secure healthcare solutions .

How to Get Involved 

Last year’s report by Skills for Care on the state of the adult social care sector and workforce in England estimated that just under 340,000 social care employees leave their jobs each year. On average, in care homes there are about 2,800 unfilled manager jobs at any one time while, despite concerted recruitment drives, vacancy rates for social workers in the statutory sector have jumped from 7.3% in 2012 to 11% in 2016, and turnover rates continue to climb.

Sharon Allen, chief executive of Skills for Care, says: “Recruitment and retention is without a doubt the biggest issue for adult social care employers because to have sufficient [levels] of the right people with the right skills is absolutely fundamental to providing quality care and support. It is a big concern for everybody and we’re trying to help promote careers in social care … but there are many challenges.”

With 80% of all jobs in adult social care held by women, something is clearly making women want to leave the sector. And the problems are not just confined to social care. In the NHS, figures from NHS Employers show that 77% of the workforce is female. There are currently 24,000 nursing vacancies (including in social care), according to the Royal College of Nursing (RCN).

In community health nursing, there has been a 12% drop overall in full-time equivalent staffing numbers since September 2009, despite growing demand.

In the East Midlands, district nurse Mary Black says her team and other colleagues are struggling to cope, because of a mixture of unfilled vacancies, maternity leave and long-term sickness absence, which directly affect patient care. “We firefight every single day: moving patient visits, ringing round to see if other teams can help, and we often have to cancel or defer. We have bank and agency nurses to cover vacancies, but not usually sickness or maternity leave, so it means the staff who are left have lots more visits to do each day,” she says. “There is no continuity, as often there’s a different agency nurse each day and there are a lot of duties and patient visits that an agency nurse can’t do, so the complex patients fall to our permanent members of the team. Agency staff often cancel at the last minute and sometimes don’t turn up.”

Black says: “It often feels like we’re not giving our patients a very good service, we cannot spend the time with them that they often need. Incidents and complaints will have risen.”

Rob Davies, a senior physiotherapist at a large hospital in the south-west, which he asked not to be named, says it struggles to attract recruits from further afield. For the last eight months, there have been 12.5 full-time equivalent vacancies for junior physiotherapists and two for senior specialist ones. With major trauma status, and a busy outpatient unit, an overnight and weekend service, the 140 members of the physiotherapy team are swamped, even when they have a full roster of staff. Stress is now the biggest cause of workplace sickness, he says. “[Staff shortages] affect everything from how you manage the caseload, and what you can do for patients, and it contributes to staff stress. It affects morale. I’m surprised that more of us in our department don’t go off sick.

“When you don’t have the right staff levels, we have to see patients on a prioritised basis,” he says. “Patients don’t get the quality and sometimes it means people get sub-optimal outcomes. It’s frustrating and demoralising.” Some of his colleagues have voted with their feet: leaving for private sector jobs with better work-life balance, or moving somewhere with lower house prices. “They are on the same money as it’s nationally done but the property prices are different,” Davies says. In the South-West, the shortages are particularly acute for more junior grades. “It tends to be easier to recruit more senior physios as they are a band up so the pay is better but it still can be an issue getting the right people down to us.”

Last month’s report on the public sector workforce by the Reform thinktank is blunt about the impact of staffing problems. “Public services fail when employees fail,” it concludes. “This is the dramatic lesson from a number of high-profile errors in recent public service delivery. In many instances, quality is compromised, not because of individual incompetence, but the way the workforce is structured and organised.”

With potentially fewer candidates from the EU and more existing staff retiring, it will be crucial for the NHS and social care sectors to attract younger people. Allen says that there is already close working with schools and job centres to promote social care as a career and adult social care has had “phenomenal success” with apprenticeships, although the government’s levy on large employers to help fund apprenticeships could risk this success. “There’s more we can do to promote social care as a really great career for young people,” says Allen. “It’s not just about getting people in, it’s about keeping them.”

In addition to recruiting and supplying staff to other home based healthcare providers, Secure Healthcare Solutions provide direct homecare services.

Housekeeping and housing support

House cleaning and all types of cleaning and other home chores can all be covered by a staff from Secure Healthcare Solutions who may do the actual job or arrange for it to be done by the right people. Payment of bills is also part of this service. Those who are still able to pursue hobbies and a social life benefit from the company’s trained assistants.

Personal care

Here the type of care is determined by the disability the patient has. The aim is however, one – to make the patient comfortable and to maintain their dignity. It entails personal hygiene, continence and other elimination matters. It also means making sure that supplies such as catheters, colostomy bags and other things that the patient may need are in stock and of the right quality.

Companionship

People who live alone may not necessarily be incapacitated by their health issues. However, loneliness can be just as bad. A friendly and professional companion from Secure Healthcare Solutions is always available whenever one is needed.

High dependency care

Here the patient needs near intensive care services. The services offered in this category are complicated and specialised. These are patients who may need respiratory support, tube feeding and intravenous medications or fluids. These are patients who may be having spinal or brain injuries. Others may be terminally ill and in need of round the clock palliative care. A skilled nurse from Secure Healthcare Solutions makes sure that such patients receive the best care possible and that all the doctor’s treatment orders are followed. These nurses also know the right questions to ask when necessary.

Live-in care

A person offering care on a continuing basis in a home considers many things. Secure Healthcare Solutions considers interests, hobbies, age and the type of disability of the client so that, the most appropriate staff is released to care for that patient. Where pets are involved, the staff’s attitude towards them is also considered. This guarantees a cordial co-existence between the carer and the client.

Respite care

Care giving can be stressful and with time burnout can result. When the care giver needs to be away for holiday or for other reasons, Secure Healthcare Solutions is ready to step-in and maintain the same care the client is used to.

Medication management

An aged patient, a mentally challenged person or a child can have difficulties in following prescribed drugs instructions. A qualified nurse is there to ascertain compliance and to prevent accidental over or under dosages. The nurse also makes sure that the medicines are kept safely and they are still potent and their expiry date is still far.

Home from hospital

Discharge from hospital can create new challenges for both patient and relatives. A Secure Healthcare Solution nurse makes sure that this transition is as smooth as possible. The nurse will arrange transport home after making all necessary clearance with the hospital. She will also make sure that all necessary equipment is available and will install what is needed by the patient at home. The homecare assistance will be tailored to meet the specific patient’s needs.

As family structure continues to evolve and homecare solutions continue to advance in various ways, people in need of specialised homecare will need more than old fashion type of assistance. The training offered by Secure Healthcare Solutions and the specific and direct homecare services it offers will become even more relevant. This is in view of the important role the company plays in the homebased healthcare industry that no individual carer can consistently match.

 

In addition to recruiting and supplying staff to other home based healthcare providers, Secure Healthcare Solutions provide direct homecare services.

Housekeeping and housing support

House cleaning and all types of cleaning and other home chores can all be covered by a staff from Secure Healthcare Solutions who may do the actual job or arrange for it to be done by the right people. Payment of bills is also part of this service. Those who are still able to pursue hobbies and a social life benefit from the company’s trained assistants.

Personal care

Here the type of care is determined by the disability the patient has. The aim is however, one – to make the patient comfortable and to maintain their dignity. It entails personal hygiene, continence and other elimination matters. It also means making sure that supplies such as catheters, colostomy bags and other things that the patient may need are in stock and of the right quality.

Companionship

People who live alone may not necessarily be incapacitated by their health issues. However, loneliness can be just as bad. A friendly and professional companion from Secure Healthcare Solutions is always available whenever one is needed.

High dependency care

Here the patient needs near intensive care services. The services offered in this category are complicated and specialised. These are patients who may need respiratory support, tube feeding and intravenous medications or fluids. These are patients who may be having spinal or brain injuries. Others may be terminally ill and in need of round the clock palliative care. A skilled nurse from Secure Healthcare Solutions makes sure that such patients receive the best care possible and that all the doctor’s treatment orders are followed. These nurses also know the right questions to ask when necessary.

Live-in care

A person offering care on a continuing basis in a home considers many things. Secure Healthcare Solutions considers interests, hobbies, age and the type of disability of the client so that, the most appropriate staff is released to care for that patient. Where pets are involved, the staff’s attitude towards them is also considered. This guarantees a cordial co-existence between the carer and the client.

Respite care

Care giving can be stressful and with time burnout can result. When the care giver needs to be away for holiday or for other reasons, Secure Healthcare Solutions is ready to step-in and maintain the same care the client is used to.

Medication management

An aged patient, a mentally challenged person or a child can have difficulties in following prescribed drugs instructions. A qualified nurse is there to ascertain compliance and to prevent accidental over or under dosages. The nurse also makes sure that the medicines are kept safely and they are still potent and their expiry date is still far.

Home from hospital

Discharge from hospital can create new challenges for both patient and relatives. A Secure Healthcare Solution nurse makes sure that this transition is as smooth as possible. The nurse will arrange transport home after making all necessary clearance with the hospital. She will also make sure that all necessary equipment is available and will install what is needed by the patient at home. The homecare assistance will be tailored to meet the specific patient’s needs.

As family structure continues to evolve and homecare solutions continue to advance in various ways, people in need of specialised homecare will need more than old fashion type of assistance. The training offered by Secure Healthcare Solutions and the specific and direct homecare services it offers will become even more relevant. This is in view of the important role the company plays in the homebased healthcare industry that no individual carer can consistently match.