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As a young adult, you may require some extra support and assistance, while living more independently or it may be that your child is moving from children’s social care to adult’s social care.

We are here to support you or your loved ones and provide care to young adults that require it, whether this is required for a few hours, a few times a week, or full time, we are here to support you. We ensure independence and allow young adults to live an active life.

At Secure Healthcare, we understand that individuals requiring help or support for a loved one, can heavily affect your emotions.

Initially, individuals may feel anxious and nervous or could feel excited and overwhelmed. Overall, it is to improve the quality of life for an individual and it allows you to live a more independent life.

If yourself or your loved one is an adult, seeking support, there is many things that you can do to make life easier. Our healthcare team can support and provide care by assisting with day-to-day tasks, support with arranging appointments, assist with providing medication, support with shopping etc.

Every young individual deserves the chance to achieve their highest potential, which is why we offer short term and long-term care for young adults with complex care needs. We want to make sure that young adults have the opportunity to identify their goals and to feel fully supported every step of the way by our experienced healthcare team.

We know that letting someone new into your home can be a difficult decision and we understand that individual’s needs are going to be different. At Secure Healthcare, we have a person-centred approach which means that our case managers assess individual needs of our service users to find the correct amount of support and care.

There are various conditions that we provide support for:
– Acquired brain injury
– Spinal cord injuries
– Palliative care
– ADHD
– Down syndrome
– Cerebral palsy
– Neurological conditions (MS & MND)
– Stroke & Hypertension
Parkinson’s & Huntington’s
– catheter, bowel & stoma care
– Tracheostomy care
Gastronomy care
– Ventilated patients
– Continence care
– PEG feeding

Supporting Young Adults What you need to know

Our healthcare team are all DBS checked, receive specialist training and have qualifications to ensure the best quality care and support is provided. Our specialist care services are regulated by the care quality commission. We ensure our team receive up to date training and are fully qualified.

When supporting young adults, there is two ways that we can provide care and support. This can be provided in a home care environment or within a care home setting.

Providing care in a personal home care setting has become very popular within society and it allows individuals to be close to their loved ones, around familiar surroundings. Another benefit of home care is that healthcare provided is more flexible, for example it could be provided for a few hours a day or a few times a week. The cost of this care is much lower compared to care within a care home. Home care also allows healthcare teams to build a stronger relationship with individual patients.

In a care home setting, care is generally more full time with individuals that have more serious healthcare conditions. Care in a care home setting is more routine based and you can not be around your loved ones as much.

Whether you require care for yourself or your loved ones within a home care environment or within a care home, find out more about our services by clicking here or contact us on 01902 302017

An individual with a learning disability often finds it difficult to understand and perform day to day tasks. Tasks may take longer to perform and some may require support from a carer to complete care. The individual living with a learning disability may find it difficult to process complicated information, interaction with other people can be a struggle, apart from primary carers who they are likely to have built a relationship with. Statistics show that 1.5mn people have a learning disability. Sometimes learning disabilities can be associated with conditions such as autism, individuals living with a learning disability will not require the same level of care. To find out more about various learning disabilities click on the link.

Individuals with learning difficulties may struggle to undertake day to day tasks, particularly if they have autism, these individuals may struggle to cook and clean, to being unable to fill in paperwork and pay bills. Individuals problems may vary and the care and support required will also differ.

Individuals living with learning difficulties often find it difficult to mix with society, and often have trouble looking after themselves. If you or your loved ones are struggling to cope alone, we encourage you to contact us, so we can support and provide care for individuals with learning difficulties.

Our live-in carers will follow a structured tailored care plan devised by our care managers after an initial care assessment has been carried out. The care plan has been devised to ensure loved ones feel safe and secure around their surroundings.

Carers will identify and adapt learn the preferences of the individuals to create a detailed care plan which will enable them to live independently. It is our carers responsibility to ensure that individuals physical and emotional needs are met. Our live-in carers may assist individuals with cooking, cleaning, washing, assisting with grocery shops or attending various places.

Our carers will develop a strong friendly relationship with the individual requiring care. They aim to involve your loved one with as many different activities aligned to the individuals interests, to keep them engaged and ensure there is a routine.

Disability Services
Disability Services

Caring for a loved one with a learning disability can be difficult, however we are here to support you. Whether this is caring for an individual in a care home or home care, we offer effective and affordable care to ensure your loved one is well looked after and supported. We offer 24-hour care if required, to be as flexible as you need us to be.

We offer the following learning disability services at Secure Healthcare Solutions:

* Domiciliary care provided within individuals personal homes.
* Registered care and nursing care within a care home or at the individuals own home.

Our specialist areas of learning disability include:

* Autism spectrum disorder
* Schizophrenia
* Personality disorder
* Anxiety/mood disorders
* Obsessive compulsive disorder

We are registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC). Please visit the link to find out more about our rating
If you are seeking learning disability support care for your loved ones, get in touch with our care team today, contact us on 01902 302 017 or email homecare@securesolutions.co.uk

If you have a relative that is sick, your natural instinct is that you want to care for them. After all, the person in question has likely always been there for you and you want to give something back. Yet you could find that after a while it takes its toll. If you have a job that you need to go to every day, have children and pets to look after or have a lengthy journey over to your loved one, it can soon become stressful. The emotional investment can keep you going but it could end up making you ill. If you get ill and burnt out from doing too much work this isn’t good for anyone. This is why it is a good idea to look into getting a home carer. If you are considering this, then there are a few things you need to remember:

Asking for help is not a failure

If you have been looking after a relative for a while, you can feel a sense of failure if you suddenly need to ask for external help. This is not the case. It is important to remember that by asking for help you are doing your loved one and yourself a favor by giving them the best care possible. This is a courageous thing to do and says a lot about how much you care about the other person. 

Your relationship with your loved one will probably improve

It can be very stressful looking after your loved one. Even though you want to do it, you may find that your stress shows as resentment or you just find it very distressing to see them that way. When the pressure of caring for them is removed, you can focus on spending quality time with them. You can play games, talk, look at photos and reminisce. Instead of worrying about their care, you can sip cups of tea and just enjoy the time you spend together. This is a much healthier way to spend your time.

home carer

Photo by Pavel Danilyuk from Pexels

They are better qualified for the role

Your home carer is qualified to do this role and will therefore be very good at it. They will know what to do in certain situations that you might have found distressing or not known what to do. They are also good at handling situations such as getting people dressed or helping them bathe with dignity. If you are too close to someone they can see this as embarrassing or that they don’t want you to do it. A carer is detached enough from the situation that it isn’t an issue.

It is important that if you are finding it difficult to look after a loved one who needs care, that you seek external help. All of our carers at Secure Healthcare Solutions are experts in their field and fully checked by the CQC for their top-quality care. If you are looking to find out more or hire a carer then please get in touch with us today.

If you are looking for a role as a home carer, see our vacancies here.

There are more than one million people in the traditional care system. They live full-time in care homes and nursing homes. Some pay for their care, others receive help from their local authority. But there are other options to these more traditional forms of care.

Moving in with a carer

In recent years, councils have become increasingly involved in shared-lives schemes – paying individuals to provide care, including personal care, in their own home. Providers are regulated and used to provide short breaks for family carers as well as full-time arrangements. More than 13,000 people benefit from shared lives, including those with learning disabilities and mental health problems as well as older people. Of the 150 schemes in the country, two-thirds are run by councils, with the rest provided by the voluntary sector.

Home share and befriending

The price of property has prompted growing interest in home-share arrangements – someone who can provide help moving in with an older person who has space free in their house. The carer provides only basic support such as shopping, cleaning or gardening, not personal care, in return for accommodation that is free or for a small rent. There are now about 20 home-share schemes in the UK, helping several hundred older people.

Another popular idea in a similar vein – older people are linked up, usually by a charity, with a volunteer who provides companionship and some low-level support, such as shopping and trips out.

Home Care or Care at Home

Living independently at home is something most of us would like to do for as long as possible. When that time comes to make the decision to ask for extra support to continue to live independently as much as possible, our home care services are tailored for exactly that. Home care  can be arranged on an hourly, daily, weekly basis or a much longer plan to suit your needs.

Home care supports activities of daily living . At home care services allow adults to receive day-to-day help with the personal care they need, preserving their dignity and maintaining a good quality of life. Assistance with activities of daily living can include bathing, grooming, and medication reminders

Costs aside, one-to-one home care offers a number of substantial benefits over residential nursing home care, both for the care recipient and for their family. One-to-one home care provides innumerable benefits, including: The maintenance of your independence and freedom to live life as you choose.

Retirement villages

Unlike in a care home, retirement-village residents usually buy an apartment on the site, although in some schemes they can part-buy or even rent the property. Residents bring their own furniture, decorate as they wish, and are free to have friends and family come to stay. Most villages allow pets to come too. They can also pay for care and support services, which are on-site, as and when they need them.

The properties have been designed to keep the individual living independently as long as possible and so can be kitted out with alarms, fall sensors and easily accessible showers. Such complexes are popular in Australia, New Zealand and South Africa, but have yet to completely take off in the UK. There are fewer than 30,000 units in the UK – Australia has six times more – with the highest concentration in the affluent South East.

Sheltered housing

There are many different types of sheltered-housing schemes. Some will have a warden, living on or off the premises, and all provide 24-hour emergency help through an alarm system. Rented accommodation is usually self-contained, but there are often communal areas, such as the lounge, laundry room and garden.

Many schemes run social events for residents. For those needing more support, extra-care sheltered housing may be available where residents can have personal care and meals provided. Most schemes are run by councils or housing associations, and there are often waiting lists for places.

Adapt your home

Equipment can be provided by councils or brought privately to make it easier for older people to live in their house for longer.Traditional aids such as stair lifts and grab rails are still popular, but technology has opened up a whole host of other options, from flood detectors to sensors that raise the alarm when the individual does not move around their property normally.

Councils and the NHS are also investing in ” telehealth ” and ” telecare ” technology, including devices to remind people to take medication and ways for carers and health staff to remotely monitor things such as blood pressure.

Relying on family and friends

By far the most popular option is family and friends. An estimated 1.5 million older people rely on them for their care needs.The care provided can be pretty substantial. A third of carers provide more than 100 hours a week of care, with many of the carers older people themselves. Sometimes this is supplemented by formal help from councils, but surveys suggest that is decreasing.

However, the pressure is having an impact on the health and wellbeing of those providing the care. Six in 10 older carers who provide 50 or more hours of care a week say their health is not good.

If you wish to learn more about how we can support you, please contact us and let one of our advisers come to see you and your family for a more detailed plan on how we can support you.