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A BBC Panorama investigation found private hospitals are not reporting enough data on patient outcomes. Patients may be being put at risk by the failure of private hospitals to report serious incidents, the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) has warned.

 

This means the private sector “cannot be as robust or as safe as the NHS”, RCS president Derek Alderson said.

The government says new guidelines will lead to tougher enforcement action against failing clinics.

The concerns, raised by the RCS, are focused on reporting serious incidents and so-called “never events” – extreme mistakes that should never happen.

These are not reported to national databases in a consistent way or at all, the RCS said.

It also warned that clinical audit data is lacking from the private sector, such as not submitting datasets on the outcomes of cancer surgery, despite undertaking many cancer procedures.

‘Not good enough’

Mr Alderson said: “We don’t know exactly what’s going on in the private sector.

“It cannot be as robust or as safe as the NHS at the moment for the simple reason that you do not have complete reporting of all patients who are treated.

“It’s not good enough. Things have to change,” he said.

The RCS also points to gaps in reporting on cosmetic surgery, where there is no dataset on the total number of operations.

Much of the private healthcare industry accepts there is a problem with data and transparency.

Brian O’Connor, of the Independent Doctors Federation, said: “It’s up to private hospitals to raise their game and to show the data and the excellence of care, because there is nothing for them to hide.”

Mr O’Connor, whose organisation represents 1,200 private doctors, added: “Those private hospitals which don’t have the data and are not transparent should be closed or not be allowed to conduct complex medical procedures.”

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Panorama heard from victims of rogue surgeon Ian Paterson, jailed for 20 years for intentionally wounding patients.

Although he was found to have harmed patients in the NHS, more than 700 people were harmed by him in private hospitals, including Beryl Parkes.

Paterson removed one of her breasts and she needed further operations to rectnify his mistakes.

Beryl Parkes

Ms Parkes said: “You believe a doctor, don’t you? They take oaths for people to do their best for them.”

But nobody was supervising Paterson.

And when Ms Parkes’s treatment was eventually reviewed, it turned out she should not have had any operations – because she did not have cancer in the first place.

“He should have got life,” she said. “And I think that’s too good for him, because it must have been basically all over money.”

Paterson’s supervisors at Spire Healthcare were criticised for failing to manage their high-earning surgeon.

The company told the BBC it is “truly sorry for the distress experienced by patients”.

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Panorama also learned that some patients are unable to get compensation if they are harmed by a private surgeon.

The hospital might refuse to accept liability because the surgeon is an independent contractor with “practising privileges”.

Lawyer Suzanne White said: “Any patient that goes through a private hospital will assume that they will be covered, and they are simply not. That is astonishing.”

Patients may not be able to get compensation from the surgeon’s insurance company either, because if the insurer decides that the surgeon has broken the rules, they can refuse to cover them.

‘Totally reprehensible’

It is a rare gap in the system, but disastrous for patients.

Mr O’Connor responded: “To say a patient who has had wrong done to them is not going to get proper compensation is totally reprehensible.”

He wants the government and private health organisations to ensure patients are compensated properly.

Panorama has discovered a case where a patient who had been harmed was unable to get compensation from the private hospital or the surgeon responsible.

He successfully sued the NHS instead, because his first consultation was in an NHS hospital.

Even the lawyer who won the case thinks it was wrong that the NHS was forced to pay up.

Suzanne White said: “I feel entirely uncomfortable about it and very cross, because I see it quite often.

“Why is it that a private hospital that has a doctor who has given negligent care – and profited – does not compensate those patients?

“Why is it the NHS has to foot the bill?”

Doctor at computer

Last year, more than 500,000 NHS patients were referred to private hospitals.

But the fastest growing area in the sector is self-pay, where people without insurance fund their own treatment to the tune of almost £900m annually.

Together, NHS referrals and self-pay patients make up nearly half the private health sector’s business.

‘Tougher enforcement’

The Association of Independent Healthcare Organisations said there is strong evidence that the independent sector is safe and patient safety is as much of a priority as it is for the NHS.

It said the Care Quality Commission has rated nearly 60% of private hospitals as either good or outstanding for safety.

The Department of Health said new standards have already set out clearer requirements for the delivery of safe care.

It said tougher enforcement action will be enabled against failing providers.

Cosmetic surgery clinics will now be rated by the CQC, and private hospitals must ensure ratings are displayed both within premises and online.

Was this your experience at the General Election? Or do you think the Government needs to improve the voting process for people with dementia? Our Campaigns team explain how you can share your experiences and help make sure the rights of people to vote are upheld.

The right to vote

The Mental Capacity Act, which provides a framework for making decisions on behalf of people who lack the capacity to make a decision, does not apply to voting. This means that a lack of mental capacity does not stop someone from being able to vote. It is up to the person to decide if they want to vote and if they need it, they should be supported to do so.

Unfortunately, we know this doesn’t always happen in practice.

Even in the most recent election, we heard from people who experienced difficulties when voting, like being asked inappropriate questions about whom they’re voting for and staff not allowing carers to support people at polling booths.

It’s clear that more needs to be done. People with conditions such as dementia should not be prevented from exercising what is a fundamental democratic right.

Make your voice heard

Help change this by sharing your experience of voting.

The Government, in partnership with other organisations, is looking for evidence from people who have disabilities about their experience of registering to vote and voting itself. From filling in the registration forms to the support available at polling stations on Election Day, they want to hear about each stage of the process.

After the consultation is complete, they’ll produce a report of all the findings. This will include recommendations about what needs to change to make sure the rights of people to vote are upheld.

So whether you have experience of registering and casting your vote yourself or you have supported someone else to do so, please do share your experiences and make sure your voice is heard.

Visit the Call for Evidence webpage on Gov.UK for details of the consultation questions and how to respond. This information is available in a range of accessible formats.

The deadline to respond is 5pm on Tuesday 14 November. If you have any questions – or want to share your experiences with us – please contact the Campaigns team at Alzheimer’s Society on change@alzheimers.org.uk

Many effects of a lack of sleep, such as feeling grumpy and not working at your best, are well known. But did you know that sleep deprivation can also have profound consequences on your physical health?

One in three of us suffers from poor sleep, with stress, computers and taking work home often blamed.

However, the cost of all those sleepless nights is more than just bad moods and a lack of focus.

Regular poor sleep puts you at risk of serious medical conditions, including obesityheart disease and diabetes – and it shortens your life expectancy.

It’s now clear that a solid night’s sleep is essential for a long and healthy life.

How much sleep do we need?

Most of us need around eight hours of good-quality sleep a night to function properly – but some need more and some less. What matters is that you find out how much sleep you need and then try to achieve it.

As a general rule, if you wake up tired and spend the day longing for a chance to have a nap, it’s likely that you’re not getting enough sleep.

A variety of factors can cause poor sleep, including health conditions such as sleep apnoea. But in most cases, it’s due to bad sleeping habits.

Find out the common medical causes of fatigue.

What happens if I don’t sleep?

Everyone’s experienced the fatigue, short temper and lack of focus that often follow a poor night’s sleep.

An occasional night without sleep makes you feel tired and irritable the next day, but it won’t harm your health.

After several sleepless nights, the mental effects become more serious. Your brain will fog, making it difficult to concentrate and make decisions. You’ll start to feel down, and may fall asleep during the day. Your risk of injury and accidents at home, work and on the road also increases.

Find out how to tell if you’re too tired to drive.

If it continues, lack of sleep can affect your overall health and make you prone to serious medical conditions, such as obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes.

Here are seven ways in which a good night’s sleep can boost your health:

1. Sleep boosts immunity

If you seem to catch every cold and flu that’s going around, your bedtime could be to blame. Prolonged lack of sleep can disrupt your immune system, so you’re less able to fend off bugs.

2. Sleep can slim you

Sleeping less may mean you put on weight! Studies have shown that people who sleep less than seven hours a day tend to gain more weight and have a higher risk of becoming obese than those who get seven hours of slumber.

It’s believed to be because sleep-deprived people have reduced levels of leptin (the chemical that makes you feel full) and increased levels of ghrelin (the hunger-stimulating hormone).

3. Sleep boosts mental wellbeing

Given that a single sleepless night can make you irritable and moody the following day, it’s not surprising that chronic sleep debt may lead to long-term mood disorders like depression and anxiety.

When people with anxiety or depression were surveyed to calculate their sleeping habits, it turned out that most of them slept for less than six hours a night.

4. Sleep prevents diabetes

Studies have suggested that people who usually sleep less than five hours a night have an increased risk of having or developing diabetes.

It seems that missing out on deep sleep may lead to type 2 diabetes by changing the way the body processes glucose – the high-energy carbohydrate that cells use for fuel.

5. Sleep increases sex drive

Men and women who don’t get enough quality sleep have lower libidosand less of an interest in sex, research shows.

Men who suffer from sleep apnoea – a disorder in which breathing difficulties lead to interrupted sleep – also tend to have lower testosterone levels, which can lower libido.

6. Sleep wards off heart disease

Long-standing sleep deprivation seems to be associated with increased heart rate, an increase in blood pressure and higher levels of certain chemicals linked with inflammation, which may put extra strain on your heart.

7. Sleep increases fertility

Difficulty conceiving a baby has been claimed as one of the effects of sleep deprivation, in both men and women. Apparently, regular sleep disruptions can cause trouble conceiving by reducing the secretion of reproductive hormones.

Depression drains your energy, hope, and drive, making it difficult to do what you need to feel better. But while overcoming depression isn’t quick or easy, it’s far from impossible. You can’t just will yourself to “snap out of it,” but you do have more control than you realise – even if your depression is severe and stubbornly persistent. The key is to start small and build from there. 

Whether you suffer from depression , high level of anxiety or you just don’t quite feel your usual perky self, don’t suffer in silence – there are lots of ways you can increase your positivity and well-being. Depression doesn’t just affect your patients; although we know that can be easy to forget when you’re busy taking care of them (which is pretty much always). The truth is, medical staff, carers and  nurses are just as prone to depression and changes in mood and feelings as anybody else, even if (or perhaps especially because) the majority of that time is spent in the hospital or healthcare establishments.

The anxieties that these jobs can bring on are brought on by many things including:

  • Feeling inadequate or incompetent as a new member of staff.
  • Being reprimanded by a supervisor or manager about something you did or didn’t do.
  • multiple and fast changes in shifts make it difficult to support.
  • Not being able to complete all of your tasks in time.
  • Dealing with a declining patient when you have multiple others to take care of.
  • Dealing with difficult families that are never pleased.
  • Taking care of demanding patients.
  • Bullying within this profession.
  • Being afraid to ask questions.
  • Dealing with difficult doctors.
  • Receiving report on a hard patient.
  • Going to bed and dreading going to work the next day because of a negative environment

Feeling better takes time, but you can get there if you make positive choices for yourself each day.

Rule 1: Reach out and stay connected

When you’re depressed, the tendency is to withdraw and isolate. Even reaching out to close family members and friends can be tough. Compound that with the feelings of shame and the guilt you may feel at neglecting your relationships.

But social support is absolutely essential to depression recovery. Staying connected to other people and the outside world will make a world of difference in your mood and outlook. And if you don’t feel that you have anyone to turn to, it’s never too late to build new friendships and improve your support network.

Six tips for reaching out and staying connected:

Talk to one person about your feelings

Help someone else by volunteering

Have lunch or coffee with a friend

Ask a loved one to check in with you regularly

Go for a walk with a workout buddy

Meet new people by taking a class or joining a club

Rule 2: Do things that make you feel good

In order to overcome depression, you have to do things that relax and energise you. This includes following a healthy lifestyle, learning how to better manage stress, setting limits on what you’re able to do, and scheduling fun activities into your day. While you can’t force yourself to have fun or experience pleasure, you can push yourself to do things, even when you don’t feel like it. You might be surprised at how much better you feel once you’re out in the world. Even if your depression doesn’t lift immediately, you’ll gradually feel more upbeat and energetic as you make time for fun activities.

Aim for eight hours of sleep. Depression typically involves sleep problems; whether you’re sleeping too little or too much, your mood suffers. Get on a better sleep schedule by learning healthy sleep habits. Expose yourself to a little sunlight every day. Lack of sunlight can make depression worse. Take a short walk outdoors, have your coffee outside, enjoy an al fresco meal, people-watch on a park bench, or sit out in the garden. Aim for at least 15 minutes of sunlight a day to boost your mood. If you live somewhere with little winter sunshine, try using a light therapy box. Practice relaxation techniques. A daily relaxation practice can help relieve symptoms of depression, reduce stress, and boost feelings of joy and well-being. Try yoga, deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, or meditation.

Come up with a list of things that you can do for a quick mood boost. The more “tools” for coping with depression, the better. Try and implement a few of these ideas each day, even if you’re feeling good:

  • Spend some time in nature
  • List what you like about yourself
  • Read a good book
  • Watch a funny movie or TV show
  • Take a long, hot bath
  • Take care of a few small tasks
  • Play with a pet
  • Talk to friends or family face-to-face
  • Listen to music
  • Do something spontaneous

Rule 3 : Move vigorously during the day

When you’re depressed, just getting out of bed can seem like a daunting task, let alone working out! But exercise is a powerful depression fighter – and one of the most important tools in your recovery arsenal. Research shows that regular exercise can be as effective as medication for relieving depression symptoms. It also helps prevent relapse once you’re well. To get the most benefit, aim for at least 30 minutes of exercise per day. This doesn’t have to be all at once—and it’s okay to start small. A 10-minute walk can improve your mood for two hours.

 

Your fatigue will improve if you stick with it. Starting to exercise can be difficult when you’re depressed and exhausted. But research shows that your energy levels will improve if you keep with it. You will be less fatigued, not more, once it’s part of your routine. Find exercises that are continuous and rhythmic. The most benefits for depression come from rhythmic exercise- such as walking, weight training, swimming, martial arts, or dancing—where you move both your arms and legs.

Rule 4 : Eat a healthy, mood-boosting diet

What you eat has a direct impact on the way you feel. Reduce your intake of foods that can adversely affect your brain and mood, such as caffeine, alcohol, trans fats, and foods with high levels of chemical preservatives or hormones (such as certain meats).

Don’t skip meals. Going too long between meals can make you feel irritable and tired, so aim to eat something at least every three to four hours.

Minimise sugar and refined carbs. You may crave sugary snacks, baked goods, or comfort foods such as pasta or French fries, but these “feel-good” foods quickly lead to a crash in mood and energy. Aim to cut out as much of these foods as possible.

Boost your B vitamins. Deficiencies in B vitamins such as folic acid and B-12 can trigger depression. To get more, take a B-complex vitamin supplement or eat more citrus fruit, leafy greens, beans, chicken, and eggs.

Rule 5 : Always challenge negative thinking

Do you feel like you’re powerless or weak? That bad things happen and there’s not much you can do about it? That your situation is hopeless? Depression puts a negative spin on everything, including the way you see yourself and your expectations for the future.

When these types of thoughts overwhelm you, it’s important to remind yourself that this is the depression talking. These irrational, pessimistic attitudes—known as cognitive distortions—aren’t realistic. When you really examine them they don’t hold up. But even so, they can be tough to give up. Just telling yourself to “think positive” won’t cut it. Often, they’re part of a lifelong pattern of thinking that’s become so automatic you’re not even completely aware of it. Once you identify the destructive thoughts patterns that you default to, you can start to challenge them with questions such as:

“What’s the evidence that this thought is true? Not true?”

“What would I tell a friend who had this thought?”

“Is there another way of looking at the situation or an alternate explanation?”

“How might I look at this situation if I didn’t have depression?”

As you cross-examine your negative thoughts, you may be surprised at how quickly they crumble. In the process, you’ll develop a more balanced perspective.

Rule 6: know when it’s time to get professional help

If you’ve taken self-help steps and made positive lifestyle changes and still find your depression getting worse, seek professional help. Needing additional help doesn’t mean you’re weak. Sometimes the negative thinking in depression can make you feel like you’re a lost cause, but depression can be treated and you can feel better!

Don’t forget about these self-help tips, though. Even if you’re receiving professional help, these tips can be part of your treatment plan, speeding your recovery and preventing depression from returning.

Rule 7: know when it’s time to move on 

Working in a bad environment , dealing with a bad employer, living with a stressing job could be the main reason why you have depression in the first place, so getting ready to move on , a change of career , profession , or working with a more flexible and friendly employer are just the key to your happiness and improving your depression condition , leaving a job after years of work is challenging but the rewards could be huge if this leads to a better and balanced life.

When you’re looking for a new job, one of the first things you ask yourself is, how much does it pay? – Most job-seekers want to improve their salaries when they’re applying for a new role – and there are lots of well-paid healthcare jobs that offer more money per hour.

Operating Department Practitioner

Salary: £27 – £36 per hour

Duties will often include:

Preparing the operating theatre and equipment, such as drips, instruments, dressings and swabs etc

  • Making sure specialist equipment is available for specific procedures
  • Monitoring theatre cleanliness to meet CQC standards
  • Ordering and rotating single or multiple use items of stock and drugs
  • Providing the surgical team with the items they need during an operation
  • Monitoring instruments
  • keeping accurate and confidential records.
  • Your work may also involve assessing patients before allowing them to join a surgical ward and reviewing the care they have received at each stage.

Job Requirements

  • Registered with the HCPC
  • Eligibility with HCPC
  • At least 6 months experience within the last 5 years working as an ODP
  • Documentation evidencing your immunisation records

For more information: Click here 

 

Band 6 Registered General Nurse

Salary: £29 – £38 per hour

Duties will often include:

  • Ensure the highest possible standards of care, assessing residents’ needs and wishes, and developing services to enhance their quality of life.
  • Champion appropriate independence and personal choice; developing, reviewing and updating care plans to meet our residents physical, social and psychological needs.
  • Oversee all aspects of medicine management on your shift – ensuring medicines are appropriately received, stored and administered, in accordance with company policies and current legislation.
  • Build the positive reputation of the Business; liaise professionally with visitors and other external stakeholders.
  • Ensure all elements of resident experience are positive, from admission to discharge.
  • Participate knowledgably and professionally to all inspection visits, ensuring your team is ready at all times to do the same.
  • Ensure compliance with all legal, regulatory and best practice guidelines – identify, investigate and resolve risks proactively.
  • Ensure you follow a rigorous monitoring and recording practice; documenting efficiently, and thoroughly all matters relating to residents and employees.
  • Promote a cohesive team approach and a welcoming atmosphere to ensure staff members feel a connection to our residents and the home, and they are well supported to deliver high quality care.
  • Understand the key targets of your host home and support the Home Manager in their achievement by promoting and practicing high standards of nursing care and ensuring staff and shifts are supervised in a smooth manner.
  • Support, guide, teach and mentor others in line with the NMC Code, following its guidance at all times.
  • Attend relevant meetings both internal and external; attend regular team meetings and monthly appraisals with line manager.
  • Act as a reflective and developmental practitioner participating to continual professional development and meeting the requirements of professional revalidation.

For more information: Click Here

General Practitioners – Locum work

Salary: £68 – £73 per hour

Responsibilities as a GP in the private hospitals

  • Supervise nursing staff in matters relating to the treatment of patients
  • Encourage and support the GP provision of the services to promote the medical and clinical services delivery as contracted in a timely manner
  • Encourage the health and well-being of all medical and clinical staff within the practice and promote efficient working methods
  • Undertake a variety of duties including surgery consultations, telephone (or other) consultations and queries, home visits, checking and signing repeat prescriptions
  • Make professional, autonomous decisions
  • Assess the healthcare needs of our patients and screen for disease risk factors and early signs of illness while developing treatment and associated care plans
  • Refer patients to other care providers as required
  • Record clear and contemporaneous consultation notes

Job Requirements:

  • Full and current GMC (UK) registration and on the GP Register
  • Be on, or fulfil the eligibility criteria to be on, a Medical Performers’ List of a Primary Care Trust in England
  • Hold a full and valid driving licence, own a car and be prepared to use it for business mileage
  • Current and credible experience within primary care
  • Have previous experience in clinical governance and quality management
  • Have experience and an understanding of clinical audit
  • Excellent interpersonal, communication (written and oral) and customer service
  • Able to work under pressure and within an ever changing environment
  • Good interpersonal skills, courteous to patients and staff at all times
  • Enthusiastic team player who is open and reflective

For more information : Click here

Registered Endoscopy Nurse

Salary: £32 – £39 per hour

Duties will often include:

  • Ensuring a high standard of nursing care to patients attending the Endoscopy Unit, working within company policies and procedures.
  • Providing technical assistance during diagnostic and therapeutic Endoscopic procedures,ensuring safe working practice.
  • Setting, monitoring and maintaining excellent standards of nursing care.
  • Maintaining personal contact with patients and relatives, being sensitive to their needs for courtesy, dignity and privacy and ensuring a friendly environment at all times.
  • Maintaining timely and accurate nursing records and ensuring that confidentiality is respected.
  • Storing, checking and administering drugs in accordance with established standards and guidelines.
  • Working with minimal supervision during endoscopic procedures, admission and recovery of patients and other related procedures.
  • Contributing to the local resolution, investigation and follow up action of any informal or formal complaints.
  • Participating in the care and maintenance of endoscopes and other specialised equipment, ensuring an agreed standard of decontamination at all times including accurate records of traceability of all endoscopes and associated equipment.
  • Ensuring the safe discharge of all patients from the Endoscopy unit.
  • Maintaining a safe and clean environment within the clinical area in accordance with established standards and regulations

Job Requirements:

  • Ability to care for patients undergoing endoscopic procedures and to provide technical assistance during diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.
  • Ability to assess, plan, implement and evaluate nursing care according to individual needs.
  • Must demonstrate an understanding of clinical risk.
  • Knowledge of GI diagnosis, treatment and health education.
  • Knowledge of EMR system.
  • Must demonstrate consistent professional conduct and meticulous attention to detail
  • Must possess excellent verbal and written communication skills as well as excellent interpersonal skills with patients, staff, and other health care professionals

For more information : Click here

Register with one of the fastest growing care and nursing agencies in West Midlands

There has never been a better time to join Secure Healthcare Solutions in a full or part time healthcare role

 

Are you a Health Care Assistant in the Birmingham area who has a passion for care? If the answer is yes, then Secure Healthcare could be the right option for you! Visit our open day to find out more about the new roles we have to offer (temp and perm).

Our team of Care Assistants within the Birmingham area are expanding and we have several vacancies available for people who share our commitment in providing excellent service.

We specialise in supplying Health Care Assistants to Nursing Homes, Residential homes, NHS hospitals, mental health hospitals and the community across the UK.

Secure Healthcare is never short of a variety of hours to cover and so has a shift to suit every worker.Our business operates 24 hours a day 7 days a week and ensures we give you constant and regular work on a daily, weekly and long term basis, we build strong relationships with our personnel which allows us to make your work with us hassle free.

This enables you the ability to specify your own work availability each week and be allocated the shifts that suit your lifestyle and commitments.

This is only one of many outstanding benefits of working with Secure Healthcare.

We offer many exciting and unique prospects such as:
Excellent pay rates.
Free and easy to use online training updates.
Referral Scheme Where you can earn up to £500.
Weekly Payment.
24/7 on-call support team.
Bonus Schemes.

Registering with us shall require you to provide:

Applicants must also have at least six months care experience in the past 2 years.
Two professional references one of which is to be either your current or most recent employer.
DBS disclosure to be carried out.
National Insurance number.
So without hesitation please apply with your most recent CV.

If there’s any problems call Tamika on 01212859449.

We look forward to welcoming you soon 🙂

Choosing the right people to provide care is vital and Secure Healthcare will help you to make the right choice. From companions and domestics through to highly experienced Carers and Registered Nurses. Following a full analysis of an individuals  needs and preferences our experienced advisers will only use staff who they feel are entirely suitable.

We pride ourselves on ensuring  persons needing support are Safe, our care treatment and support helps you to maintain quality of life based on best available evidence, our staff involve and treat you with compassion, kindness, dignity and respect. We ensure our services are responsive to your needs and our management ensure high quality care is provided based on an individuals needs.

If you wish to learn more about how we can support you, please contact us and let one of our advisers come to see you and your family for a more detailed plan on how we can support you.

Living independently at home is something most of us would like to do for as long as possible. When that time comes to make the decision to ask for extra support to continue to live independently as much as possible, our home care services are tailored for exactly that.

Tailored Home Care services to meet all your needs

Our trained caring friendly staff have your Dignity and respect at the forefront of delivering personalised care in the comfort of your own home. When providing home care for yourself or a family member or friend, we take the time to get to know you and make sure you are continually happy with the care you received and the staff that support you.

Home care can be arranged on an hourly, daily, weekly basis or a much longer plan to suit your needs. We  provides in-home care and support services to people so they can live as independently as possible in their own homes and communities. We support people to live life the way they choose.

The best person to know what support you need to remain as independent as possible in your own home is you. That is why everything we do is designed around your needs and goals. These can be relatively simple like help with shopping through to high dependency 24 hour care.

  • Housekeeping
  • Personal care
  • Companionship
  • Support with information and advice
  • Housing support
  • High dependency care
  • Live-in care
  • Respite care
  • Medication management
  • Hospital to Home service
  • Complex and specialist care

    What tasks to expect from our Carers and Nurses ?

All our staff can help with personal care (assistance with washing, dressing and toileting), mobility and home management. The UK’s Nursing & Midwifery Council recommends that a qualified Nurse is booked for:

  • More advanced medical conditions
  • Management of equipment, e.g. catheters, hoists
  • Administering (rather than prompting) medication
  • Wound care, e.g. pressure sores
  • Professional liaison with local healthcare professionals

Secure Healthcare care can:

  • Professionally assess your needs
  • Identify any risk to client or staff (e.g. from manual handling tasks)
  • Work with your local GP and District Nurse, if appropriate
  • Create (with your full input) a detailed Care Plan.

If you are still unsure about what type of staff you need please feel free to contact us speak to an adviser or contact your local GP or care professional.

Contact our Homecare Department:
Call us on 01902 302017 or write us to homecare@securehealthcaresolutions.co.uk

Are you a Health Care Assistant in the Birmingham area who has a passion for care? If the answer is yes, then Secure Healthcare could be the right option for you!

Visit our open day to find out more about the new roles we have to offer (temp and perm).

We specialise in supplying Health Care Assistants to Nursing Homes, Residential homes, NHS hospitals, Mental health hospitals and the community across the UK. Secure Healthcare is never short of a variety of hours to cover and so has a shift to suit every worker.

Our business operates 24 hours a day 7 days a week and ensures we give you constant and regular work on a daily, weekly and long term basis, we build strong relationships with our personnel which allows us to make your work with us hassle free.

This enables you the ability to specify your own work availability each week and be allocated the shifts that suit your lifestyle and commitments….

This is only one of the outstanding benefits of working with Secure Healthcare.
We offer many exciting and unique prospects such as;
• Excellent pay rates
• Free and easy to use online training updates
• Weekly Payment
• 24/7 on-call support team
• Bonus Schemes

Secure Your Career with Secure Healthcare Solutions Today.

To Book you place please call us on 0121 285 9449 or contact Vidas Savickas by Email if you would like more information using cv@securehealthcaresolutions.co.uk

Registering with us shall require you to provide two professional references. One of which is to be either your current or most recent employer. It is also necessary for an enhanced DBS disclosure to be carried out.

Applicants must also have at least six months care experience in the past 2 years.

We look forward to welcoming you soon ?