Loading Jobs...

Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust, which also runs City Hospital in Birmingham and Rowley Regis Hospital, has been given a requires improvement rating from the Care Quality Commission.

England’s Chief Inspector of Hospitals has rated the services provided by Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust as Requires Improvement following an inspection by the Care Quality Commission.

This inspection included the following core services; emergency department, medical services, surgery services, end of life care services, outpatient and diagnostic imaging services and the Birmingham Midland Eye Centre. Further unannounced inspections were carried out on 6, 11, 12 and 13 April 2017.

CQC has rated the trust as Requires Improvement overall. It was rated as Outstanding for being caring, Good for being well-led and Requires Improvement for being safe, effective, responsive. The trust’s previous rating was Requires Improvement.

Inspectors found that many services had improved since our 2015 inspection with End of Life Care being rated as Outstanding at both hospitals and in the community service; however, community inpatients was rated as inadequate.

CQC’s Chief Inspector of Hospitals, Professor Ted Baker, said:

“Although some improvements had been noted since our previous from October 2014, the trust had not made all the necessary changes to alter their rating.”

“Staff in the outpatients department did not have their competencies assessed to ensure they were confident and competent to carry out their role. The trust did not always ensure there was enough staffing or appropriate skill mix.”

“CQC rated the community inpatient services as inadequate because of lack of mental health capacity assessments, poor care planning and inconsistent assessment of risk.”

“Paediatric Ophthalmology services were delivered in a service that was not focused on the needs of children.”

“Despite these concerns, we found a number of areas of outstanding and good practice across Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust. “Staff must be particularly commended for their caring approach and we rated this area as Outstanding overall. We also rated end of life services and community health services for children and young people as Outstanding.”

“Patients and family members said that the care was not only excellent but that staff always went that extra mile. We observed interactions across the trust and spoke to numerous patients and relatives whom said they were treated well and kept up to date and well informed about their treatment.”

“The trust leadership knows what it needs to do to bring about improvement in the areas identified and our inspectors will return at a later date to check on what progress has been made.”

The CQC has told the trust it must take action in several areas, including:

  • Patients in the emergency department must receive treatment within one hour of arriving in line with the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM) recommendation.
  • Medical care services must ensure temporary staff being used are competent to fulfil the role.
  • Records of care and treatment in surgery provided to patients are accurate and complete.
  • The trust must ensure doctors use the appropriate proforma in place for effective clinical pathways.
  • The trust must improve local governance and ensure risks to the service are escalated, recorded, actioned and reviewed in a timely manner.

Inspectors saw several areas of outstanding practice, including:

  • The palliative and end of life care service ensured that patients and their families were involved in their care and their choices and preferences were upheld, including where they would prefer to be for their care and when they died.
  • Staff showed great compassion, empathy and an understanding of patient’s needs and preferences.
  • Newton 4 ward at Sandwell displayed a high-level person centred care approach. A number of innovative practices were developed on this ward, which included the breakfast therapy club to aid with patient rehabilitation, rewarded by the Stroke Association.
  • The palliative and end of life care service integrated coordination hub acted as one single point of access for patients and health professionals to coordinate end of life services for patients.

Full reports for the trust are available on the cqc website.

Secure Healthcare Solutions is proud to support Wolves Community Trust during the 2017/18 season.
 
Wolves Community Trust, the registered charity of Wolverhampton Wanderers FC, supports the local community through delivering projects relevant to sport, health, education, inclusion and community donations.
 
We have teamed up with the trust to bring the fantastic sport of walking football to people in and around Wolverhampton. The aim of walking football is to help older people, or those with limited mobility, remain active and fit, while still pursuing their love for the beautiful game in a fun and sociable environment.
 
Each year, the projects delivered by Wolves Community trust reach around 25,000 local residents of all ages, genders, socio-economic and ethnic demographics. Over 4,000 participants are engaged in sports programmes alone, with over 85 weekly sessions being delivered to the communities.
 
For further information about the great work Wolves Community Trust does, and to find out more about walking football sessions, visit www.wolvescommunitytrust.org.uk/.

What is Hypotention ?

Doctors measure blood pressure using two numbers – the first and higher of the two is called the systolic blood pressure, and it occurs when the heart beats and fills the arteries of the body with blood. The lower number is called the diastolic blood pressure, and it’s the pressure in the heart when it rests between heartbeats. A normal blood pressure is said to be in the region of 120/80mmHg (systolic/diastolic) and doctors spend a lot of time dealing with people with high blood pressure. Use a blood pressure chart to see what your blood pressure means.

Low blood pressure (hypotension) on the other hand often requires no treatment but elderly people in particular can find it a problem, especially when standing up from sitting or lying down. In general terms, the medical advice is that the lower the blood pressure the better, and for most people their blood pressure rarely falls below 90/60.

Recognition

However, low blood pressure can sometimes mean there’s not enough blood flowing to your brain and other vital organs, which can lead to symptoms such as:

What to do if you have symptoms

If you think you may be experiencing an episode of low blood pressure, you should:

  • stop what you’re doing
  • sit or lie down
  • drink some water

The symptoms will usually pass after a few seconds or minutes.

When to see your GP

You should see your GP if you have frequent symptoms of low blood pressure. Your GP can measure your blood pressure and help identify any underlying causes of the problem. Read more about diagnosing low blood pressure.

Low blood pressure after suddenly standing up

If you experience symptoms of low pressure after changing positions, such as standing up, it’s known as postural, or orthostatic, hypotension. Symptoms shouldn’t last longer than a few seconds, as your blood pressure will adjust to your new position. This type of low blood pressure tends to affect people more as they get older, when it can lead to more frequent falls. Similar symptoms may also occur after exercise.

Low blood pressure after eating

If you experience symptoms after eating, it’s known as postprandial hypotension. It occurs more often in older people, particularly in those who have high blood pressure or conditions such as Parkinson’s disease and diabetes mellitus. After a meal, your intestines need a large amount of blood for digestion. If your heart rate doesn’t increase enough to maintain blood pressure, your blood pressure will fall, causing symptoms.

Low blood pressure after standing for long periods

Some people experience symptoms after standing up for long periods of time. This is sometimes known as neutrally mediated hypotension, and most often affects children and young adults.

Read more about the causes of low blood pressure and High blood pressure in the elderly

What is Hypotention ?

Doctors measure blood pressure using two numbers – the first and higher of the two is called the systolic blood pressure, and it occurs when the heart beats and fills the arteries of the body with blood. The lower number is called the diastolic blood pressure, and it’s the pressure in the heart when it rests between heartbeats. A normal blood pressure is said to be in the region of 120/80mmHg (systolic/diastolic) and doctors spend a lot of time dealing with people with high blood pressure. Use a blood pressure chart to see what your blood pressure means.

Low blood pressure (hypotension) on the other hand often requires no treatment but elderly people in particular can find it a problem, especially when standing up from sitting or lying down. In general terms, the medical advice is that the lower the blood pressure the better, and for most people their blood pressure rarely falls below 90/60.

Recognition

However, low blood pressure can sometimes mean there’s not enough blood flowing to your brain and other vital organs, which can lead to symptoms such as:

What to do if you have symptoms

If you think you may be experiencing an episode of low blood pressure, you should:

  • stop what you’re doing
  • sit or lie down
  • drink some water

The symptoms will usually pass after a few seconds or minutes.

When to see your GP

You should see your GP if you have frequent symptoms of low blood pressure. Your GP can measure your blood pressure and help identify any underlying causes of the problem. Read more about diagnosing low blood pressure.

Low blood pressure after suddenly standing up

If you experience symptoms of low pressure after changing positions, such as standing up, it’s known as postural, or orthostatic, hypotension. Symptoms shouldn’t last longer than a few seconds, as your blood pressure will adjust to your new position. This type of low blood pressure tends to affect people more as they get older, when it can lead to more frequent falls. Similar symptoms may also occur after exercise.

Low blood pressure after eating

If you experience symptoms after eating, it’s known as postprandial hypotension. It occurs more often in older people, particularly in those who have high blood pressure or conditions such as Parkinson’s disease and diabetes mellitus. After a meal, your intestines need a large amount of blood for digestion. If your heart rate doesn’t increase enough to maintain blood pressure, your blood pressure will fall, causing symptoms.

Low blood pressure after standing for long periods

Some people experience symptoms after standing up for long periods of time. This is sometimes known as neutrally mediated hypotension, and most often affects children and young adults.

Read more about the causes of low blood pressure and High blood pressure in the elderly

Cavell Nurses’ Trust Trust is  always looking for enthusiastic volunteers to help spread the word about Cavell Nurses’ Trust or work on specific projects. Could you spare a few hours to help them out to support nurses in need?

Cavell Nurses’ Trust is Edith Cavell’s legacy, a charity set up in her name that, nowadays, supports nurses, midwives and healthcare assistants suffering hardship. They provide support for UK nurses, midwives and healthcare assistants, both working and retired, when they’re suffering personal or financial hardship – often because of illness, disability, domestic abuse and the effects of older age. “We’re a charity, and we help people at no cost to them. We give a listening ear and practical support to everyone who asks for help.”

Mya helped out at Cavell Nurses’ Trust offices

“I am currently studying for my A-levels and after that I would like to pursue my dream career of becoming a nurse; this is why I joined the Cavell Nurses’ Trust on my work experience week, in which I have gained office skills and independent research abilities.

“I have enjoyed my time at Cavell Nurses’ Trust, the people are extremely helpful, positive and friendly, and they have welcomed me into their charity, in which I am greatly thankful for.”

Sabrina took part in a bucket collection at Birmingham New Street

“Collecting at Birmingham New Street Station for Cavell Nurses’ Trust was such a brilliant experience it will stay with me forever. I was helping to support nurses, midwives and healthcare assistants in their time of need. This really touched me as I am a student nurse so I really wanted to raise as much money as I possibility could.

“I love volunteering and going the extra mile to raise awareness as I believe everyone can change someone else’s life for the better.

“I’m always being told I am a happy and smiley person but for members of the public to tell me to “keep up the hard work” and “carry on smiling” is really astonishing! I found it surprising that from just a few hours of volunteering my confidence grew so much and I went from an empty bucket to a heavy bucket of donations quite quickly.

“Volunteering is something I would definitely do again. It was such a great experience considering it’s my first time volunteering for Cavell Nurses’ Trust and I received great support and from the team which is amazing.”

Browse through the history of Cavell Nurses’ Trust, from the life of Edith Cavell herself right through to the latest milestones achieved by the charity.

If you are interested in  volunteering opportunities please email : fundraising@cavellnursestrust.org

Nursing is Career … Not just a Job

You’re ready for a new job opportunity. Started job search and managed to book yourself an Interview , all is good and as planned, by this point, you need to do your home work to be ready to sell yourself and the best way in doing so is to have a close look at your potential employer’s website.This will help you grow your confidence level and show your future employer you care and want the Job more than the other candidates.

Did you know that you have a chance of asking HR questions before accepting a job offer as a nurse? The widespread shortage of nurses in many places gives you room to be a job seeker with a choice on who to work for. Don’t be timid. Ask questions about what you consider important to you and how you carry out your job. Worth considering the following questions before giving a definite answer :

  1. About salary and allowances

Ask about your starting salary and compare this with what is offered in your area for similar roles .  Inquire about allowances in relation to relocation, overtime and any other special nursing care related duties. Many healthcare agencies fail to guarantee secured working hours for their nurses. A great way to find out is to just ask and check your future employer’s reviews, testimonials and social media accounts.

  1. Job related benefits

What does the company offer for your personal healthcare? This relates to matters such as insurance, paid vacation/leave and maternity leave for women.

  1. Interpersonal relationships

Strive to know the relationship between the administration and the workers.  How easy can you have issues resolved between you and a fellow member of staff or between you and the administration? Does the company have a mentorship program?

  1. Education and Training opportunities

Does the company have a continuing education program that will improve your CV and Overall Career Development ? Opportunities to get certifications in certain areas can help in your professional progression. Many healthcare agencies do offer mandatory training , offer courses and development days to help nurses improve their practice and support their continuing professional development (CPD). It is a great chance to ask your future employer if training is included in your employment contract.

  1. Will your personal special circumstances be considered in your new job role?

This can relate to physical or social-family issues. A pregnant or nursing mother for example may find it challenging to work in certain areas. Such mothers may need a department with more flexibility where it may be possible to take a break or reduce working hours (part time ) when circumstances demand. In addition to talking to the HR officer, talk to nurses and other staff who are already working with the company. You will learn from them some things that HR may not be willing to tell you. All these will help you to decide whether take the job opportunity or not.

If you make it a priority to ask these important questions before you accept a nursing job offer, you’ll be much happier with your decision—whether you accept or decline it. It might seem like a good idea to at first take what you can get, but what you want at the end of the day is to love your job and the best way to achieve this is to do your homework beforehand.

Small things like that can be helpful conversation topics during an interview and, ultimately, they can make all the difference in securing the position. Secure Healthcare Solutions is a specialist in establishment healthcare staffing solutions across England. We are actively recruiting and supplying front line staff in Birmingham and the West Midlands,Northampton, Milton Keynes, London, Manchester and Bristol areas.

 

Nursing is Career … Not just a Job

You’re ready for a new job opportunity. Started job search and managed to book yourself an Interview , all is good and as planned, by this point, you need to do your home work to be ready to sell yourself and the best way in doing so is to have a close look at your potential employer’s website.This will help you grow your confidence level and show your future employer you care and want the Job more than the other candidates.

Did you know that you have a chance of asking HR questions before accepting a job offer as a nurse? The widespread shortage of nurses in many places gives you room to be a job seeker with a choice on who to work for. Don’t be timid. Ask questions about what you consider important to you and how you carry out your job. Worth considering the following questions before giving a definite answer :

  1. About salary and allowances

Ask about your starting salary and compare this with what is offered in your area for similar roles .  Inquire about allowances in relation to relocation, overtime and any other special nursing care related duties. Many healthcare agencies fail to guarantee secured working hours for their nurses. A great way to find out is to just ask and check your future employer’s reviews, testimonials and social media accounts.

  1. Job related benefits

What does the company offer for your personal healthcare? This relates to matters such as insurance, paid vacation/leave and maternity leave for women.

  1. Interpersonal relationships

Strive to know the relationship between the administration and the workers.  How easy can you have issues resolved between you and a fellow member of staff or between you and the administration? Does the company have a mentorship program?

  1. Education and Training opportunities

Does the company have a continuing education program that will improve your CV and Overall Career Development ? Opportunities to get certifications in certain areas can help in your professional progression. Many healthcare agencies do offer mandatory training , offer courses and development days to help nurses improve their practice and support their continuing professional development (CPD). It is a great chance to ask your future employer if training is included in your employment contract.

  1. Will your personal special circumstances be considered in your new job role?

This can relate to physical or social-family issues. A pregnant or nursing mother for example may find it challenging to work in certain areas. Such mothers may need a department with more flexibility where it may be possible to take a break or reduce working hours (part time ) when circumstances demand. In addition to talking to the HR officer, talk to nurses and other staff who are already working with the company. You will learn from them some things that HR may not be willing to tell you. All these will help you to decide whether take the job opportunity or not.

If you make it a priority to ask these important questions before you accept a nursing job offer, you’ll be much happier with your decision—whether you accept or decline it. It might seem like a good idea to at first take what you can get, but what you want at the end of the day is to love your job and the best way to achieve this is to do your homework beforehand.

Small things like that can be helpful conversation topics during an interview and, ultimately, they can make all the difference in securing the position. Secure Healthcare Solutions is a specialist in establishment healthcare staffing solutions across England. We are actively recruiting and supplying front line staff in Birmingham and the West Midlands,Northampton, Milton Keynes, London, Manchester and Bristol areas.

 

 As a nurse, you’ll need to go through appraisals, reflective discussions, and confirmation not just to satisfy licensing requirements but to also improve your performance as a health professional. Read on to learn more about these essential processes.

What are appraisals?

Appraisals are an important part of your work life as a nurse. Whether you like it or not, you’ll need to go through these processes to measure your development in the past year, identify the areas where you need improvement, and create personal development for the next 12 months. With the introduction of revalidation in April 2016, appraisals have become even more important since they help nurses prepare for their revalidation and registration renewal.

If you’re an agency nurse, you’re not required to get an appraisal every year. But, just like any other nurse, you do need to undergo reflective discussion and confirmation a few months or weeks before your revalidation date. With this in mind, it makes sense to schedule these processes during your annual appraisal to hit several birds with one stone. Take note, though: your reflective discussion and confirmation should be done within 12 months before your revalidation date. Any sooner than that may raise questions about the relevancy of your revalidation requirements.

What are reflective discussions?

You need to complete at least five reflective pieces as a part of the revalidation process. These pieces should be written within the three years that lead up to your revalidation date.

Your written accounts can be based on your general practice, feedback from your patients or colleagues, and the courses you take for your CPD. You can also relate them to articles that you have read or events that you have attended — as long as these articles or events are relevant to your practice and reflect the four themes of the Code. By writing these accounts, you’ll find it easier to adopt reflective practices and identify the improvements that you can make to your practice.

Once you have completed at least five written accounts, you can undergo the process of reflective discussion. This should be a face-to-face conversation with another healthcare professional who is registered with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC). During this process, you will discuss your written reflections in detail.

When choosing a partner for reflective discussion, you’re not required to select someone who has the same specialism as you and who works with you on a daily basis. However, you are required to fill out the reflective discussion form and obtain your partner’s signature. Doing this will serve as evidence that you’re not professionally isolated and that you interact with others in the healthcare field.

What is the confirmation process?

Before you submit your revalidation application, you’ll need to have a confirmation meeting, which allows you to review the evidence that you have gathered over the past three years. Your confirmation meeting should be with your line manager who may or may not be registered with the NMC. If this isn’t possible, you can have the meeting with a doctor, pharmacist, or any other UK-registered healthcare professional whom you work with.

During your confirmation meeting, make sure to proactively interact with your Confirmer and discuss all the details of your CPD, reflective accounts, and other items in your portfolio. You need to show that you’re dedicated to your practice and have taken accountability for your growth and improvement. You also must demonstrate that you can adapt to changes in the clinical setting.

Of course, don’t forget to complete the NCM appraisal/confirmation form and get the signature of your line manager/Confirmer once your meeting is done. Getting two copies of the form is recommended so you can keep one copy for yourself and include the other in your revalidation application.

Revalidation is a new process that nurses and midwives have to go through before they can renew their registration with the Nurses and Midwives Council (NMC). It’s designed to improve public protection by ensuring that healthcare professionals are fit to practice and that they’re knowledgeable about the latest methods and techniques in the healthcare sector.

Nurses and midwives understandably feel nervous about revalidation. However, the pressure is even greater for agency staff, many of whom usually don’t get as much training and support as permanent employees. Fortunately, if you’re an agency nurse, take note that there are some things that you can do to make revalidation easier and less stressful. Here are a few tips you can use:

1. Create a free online account at the NMC’s website. Having an account is greatly helpful since it lets you check your exact revalidation date and get a list of the requirements that you’ll need to prepare. The NMC will also send you a notification 60 days before your revalidation is due, ensuring that you won’t forget it.

2. Prepare for your revalidation at least 6 months in advance. As mentioned above, the NMC will remind you about your revalidation two months before the due date, but two months usually aren’t enough. Remember: you won’t only have to gather the required paperwork but you’ll also need to do mental and emotional preparation and make yourself ready to write your reflective pieces.

3. Speak to friends and colleagues who have already gone through revalidation. Ask questions about their experience and take note of their tips so you’ll have a clear idea of what you need to do. Of course, when the time comes to help someone else in the future, don’t hesitate to share what you’ve learned.

4. Make the NMC code the center of your life. Whenever you write your reflections and have discussions, always link your experiences as well as the lessons you’ve learned to the code. Appraisers and Confirmers will look at how you have internalized the code and made it a part of your life as a healthcare professional.

5. Whenever you undergo training, write your insights about the things that you have learned on the back of the certificate that you’ll receive. This way, you can express your thoughts while they’re still fresh in your mind, and you can use these later on when you’re preparing reflections for your revalidation portfolio. Make sure to keep your training certificates in a safe place!

6. Read nursing and medical articles in magazines a few months before your revalidation is due. This way, you’ll have enough time to digest their content and think of how you can apply them to your work. You can even make it a habit to write notes as you read so you can have more details to add to your reflections portfolio.

7. Before asking a patient for their feedback, make sure that you have built a good rapport with them first. Doing this is important so they won’t feel like you’re intruding into their privacy. Don’t forget to obtain their consent and explain that you need the feedback for your revalidation.

8. Search for forums, support groups, and interactive sessions that are organized by senior nurses or revalidation experts. This way, you can speak with people who have gone through the process and/or know it inside out and can give you helpful tips.

9. Look for free or discounted courses that will help you complete the required number of hours of continuing professional development without paying too much. The NMC doesn’t have a list of prescribed activities, so it’s up to you to choose those that are relevant to your professional development

10. Enjoy the process! Think of your revalidation as a way of doing your part to improve the nursing community and the healthcare sector as a whole.

These are just some tips that agency nurses can use when undergoing revalidation. Do you have any advice to add to this list? Share them with us!

The public health service of England, namely the (NHS), provides the type of healthcare for permanent residents. As it is paid for from the general taxation, these services are free to use. However, healthcare provisions are not all the same all around the UK. Despite the fact that the public system is a more dominant provision, those who are willing to pay will be given private healthcare as well as other complementary and alternative treatments.

The public health service of England, namely the National Health Service (NHS), provides the type of healthcare for permanent residents. As it is paid for from the general taxation, these services are free to use. However, healthcare provisions are not all the same all around the UK. Despite the fact that the public system is a more dominant provision, those who are willing to pay will be given private healthcare as well as other complementary and alternative treatments.

Healthcare Services for Patients

If a patient coming from a clinic or hospital will require any specialist care, he or she will be informed by the medical practitioner where to acquire necessary treatment. This will cover private or public hospitals and the NHS will have to pay for treating a patient in a private institution provided that the hospital meets with criteria of service and cost.

If a patient needs immediate medical services, the general practitioner (GP) will have to request for the bypass of normal booking where they can arrange for an emergency admission. Generally, treatment along with the medication administered for almost all NHS hospitals is free. This will include surgical consumables and any appliances loaned or issued.

For instances where a patient chooses to acquire treatment in a private arrangement of NHS hospitals with agreement from a consultant, the patient will be billed. This can also be applicable for insurance companies. This can be done because from the beginning, NHS hospital consultants are given permission to continue private duties and enabled private patients to jump the queue of the NHS.

NHS Healthcare vs US Healthcare

Most developed countries such as the UK rank above the United States in terms of health measurements. This is because of the fact that its citizens have longer life expectancy with lower child or infant mortality rate. More so, the UK has a lot of acute care hospital beds per person with lesser deaths that are related to medical or surgical mishaps.

Accordingly, the impressive performance of Britain has been ranked by the World Health Organisation higher than that of the US. There are measures, however, wherein the US outperforms that of the UK such as the lower rates of cancer mortality.

Existence of Private Health Insurance in the UK

The existence of Britain’s private health insurance works similarly with that of the United States. As incentive for workers, many employers are able to provide private health insurance plans. However, only a few patients choose private medical services over the NHS system. For this reason, they can choose the specialists they want and they are able to get rid of waiting lists intended for non-emergencies.

An average of 8 weeks is given to patients under NHS requiring admission to hospitals. Meanwhile, 4 weeks are given to out-patients and 2 weeks given for those needing diagnostic testing. Although NHS patients can choose the hospital they need to get treated, choosing their own specialists are of no avail to them.