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Individuals that have long term conditions or serious health conditions are more likely to benefit from live-in care. Serious conditions such as ventilation care, cancer care etc, are likely to make individuals feel weak and unable to do daily tasks, which are normally simple to do. Examples include, grocery shopping or getting around the house.

We have always been in favour of providing live-in care in a home care environment, so individuals are close to their loved ones and around a comfortable setting, as opposed to a care home environment.

It is important that our service users are supported and cared for to make everyday life much easier, also to ensure that medication is administered on time, which all contributes to the well being of our patients. Below we will highlight how live-in care can help individuals within a home care setting.

Live-in care services offer:

– Independence, enabling you to live at home around your loved ones and within your own environment.
– Tailored care and support provided to an individual. Closely working with care managers to ensure the best quality care and support is provided in a home environment.
– By having a live-in carer, it is more of an affordable approach, compared to residential care.
– Help with everyday tasks throughout the day, such as support with cleaning the house, using the bathroom, preparing food and to assist with movement around the house.
– No restrictions to eat and drink when you want and being around loved ones.
Companionship, feel free to open up to our healthcare team about any problems that you are encountering.
– Care provided in a home care setting, allows individuals to stay closed to their pets for companionship and also you are not limited to spend time outdoors.

Mental health boost
Having somebody that you can talk to and be around can be a great way to reduce mental health matters.

Loneliness with elderly people is very common, particularly as the younger generation have busy lifestyles and childcare commitments.

A live-in care worker could be a great avenue to ensure companionship and to support with jobs around the house, so our service users can spend quality time with their loved ones, as much as possible.

live-in care
live-in care

Personal care support
Personal care assistance, such as assisting with using the bathroom, support with cleaning the house, preparing food and movement around the house. Here at Secure Healthcare, we ensure our service users live a quality life and provide the best quality care and support.

Health routine
Personal home care allows better health treatment, more time is spent with individual service users to ensure the best care and support is provided.

Within a home care setting, you can also eat a healthy balanced diet and you are not restricted to eating a set diet, which is more common in a residential home.

Social events
Care provided within a home care setting allows social activities to boost individual moods. Whether this is meeting with friends, family members or going to events, then home care is an appropriate setting, as this is limited within residential homes.

If yourself or somebody that you know are seeking live-in care, then find out more about our services by clicking here or contact our home care team on 0121 285 9449.

Mental health problems are often triggered by events, lifestyles, or genetics. It can sometimes be clear that you suffer from mental illnesses or you may not be aware that you suffer from mental health illness. It is advised to get properly assessed by a doctor to determine if you have a mental health illness. The NHS reports that approximately one in four adults and one in ten children experience mental health issues in their lifetime.

Mental health is something that a lot of us can relate to, we are here to support and tailor care for people with a range of mental illnesses. Individuals may have mild or more serious mental health issues. Problems could include, schizophrenia, bipolar, depression, anxiety, personality disorders, eating disorders, and much more!

Secure Healthcare Solutions are here to provide care and support within homecare services and within the care home environment for individuals experiencing mental health problems. We focus and cater care to meet the needs of the individuals requiring support. Our carers, support workers, and nurses are professionally trained to deliver quality mental health support and are provided regular training.
Our mental health plans are individually created to meet the needs of individuals being cared for, based on pre-admission and through a risk assessment, to enable us to create effective treatment plans for short-term and long-term clients.

As a healthcare agency that provides mental health support workers and nurses, we have a great deal of experience to support and care for individuals that experience mental health.

Secure Healthcare ensures to create a safe living environment, focusing on fun activities and social involvement within homes and care homes and we work with the local community.

Mental health support in your home
Individuals will continue to live in their own homes but have access to a support worker who you can talk to support you while living independently.

Supported housing for individuals with mental health needs
Generally, individuals will have their own flat within a complex where there is mental health support staff on-site to provide support when necessary. The staff may not be there 24/7.

Mental health support
mental health problems

Care homes for people with mental health needs
In a care home setting, residents normally have their own bedroom, but share social spaces. Staff is on-site at all times to deal with residents’ needs.

How we can help?

  • Meal preparation
  • Helping with washing and cleaning, it could be washing the dishes, over hoovering the home
  • Assisting with washing, dressing, and ensuring individuals are maintaining a good personal appearance.
  • Support with social activities
  • Housework and light domestic duties
  • Preparing and cooking meals
  • Support with household bills and filling in the paperwork

If you are experiencing mental health, the NHS recommends various charities that deal with various mental health illnesses, who are here to support you during difficult times.

Click here to find out more

Speak to our trained professionals today to see how we can support individuals requiring care with mental health. Email us at homecare@securesolutions.co.uk or call us on 01902 302 017 to discuss how we can support you to provide the best possible care and support.

Mental health impacts our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we feel, our mood, and the way we feel. It also impacts how we cope, interact and develop relationships with others. You can be affected during childhood and adulthood. The NHS reports that 1 in 4 people will experience a mental health problem during their lifetime.

Mental health is something that a lot of us can relate to, we are here to support and tailor care for people with a range of mental illnesses. Individuals may have mild or more serious mental health issues. Problems could include, schizophrenia, bipolar, depression, anxiety, personality disorders, eating disorders, and much more!

Main Symptoms of mental health
– Feeling down, upset or tearful
– Sleep disturbance, appetite changes, and low energy
– Mood changes, highs, and lows
– Confused thinking and finding it difficult to concentrate
– Withdrawing communication from friends and family
– Struggling to deal with daily problems and feeling stressed
– Problems with alcohol and drug use
– Excessive anger
– Suicidal thinking

Secure Healthcare Solutions are here to provide care and support within homecare services and within the care home environment for individuals experiencing mental health problems. We focus and cater care to meet the needs of the individuals requiring support. Our carers, support workers, and nurses are professionally trained to deliver quality mental health support and are provided regular training.

Our mental health plans are individually created to meet the needs of individuals being cared for, based on pre-admission and through a risk assessment, to enable us to create effective treatment plans for short-term and long-term clients.

As a healthcare agency that provides mental health support workers and nurses, we have a great deal of experience to support and care for individuals that experience mental health.

Secure Healthcare ensures to create a safe living environment, focusing on fun activities and social involvement within homes and care homes and we work with the local community.

Mental health support in your home
Individuals will continue to live in their own homes but have access to a support worker who you can talk to support you while living independently.

mental health
Male College Student Meeting With Campus Counselor Discussing Mental Health Issues

Supported housing for individuals with mental health needs
Generally, individuals will have their own flat within a complex where there is mental health support staff on-site to provide support when necessary. The staff may not be there 24/7.

Care homes for people with mental health needs
In a care home setting, residents normally have their own bedroom, but share social spaces. Staff is on-site at all times to deal with resident’s needs.

How we can help?
• Meal preparation
• Helping with washing and cleaning, it could be washing the dishes, over hoovering the home
• Assisting with washing, dressing, and ensuring individuals are maintaining a good personal appearance.
• Support with social activities
• Housework and light domestic duties
• Preparing and cooking meals
• Support with household bills and filling in the paperwork

If you are experiencing mental health, the NHS recommends various charities that deal with various mental health illnesses, who are here to support you during difficult times.

Click here to find out more

Speak to our trained professionals today to see how we can support individuals requiring care with mental health. Email us at homecare@securesolutions.co.uk or call us on 01902 302 017 to discuss how we can support you to provide the best possible care and support.

Worldwide pregnant women experience mental health during pregnancy or after birth. On average WHO reports that 10% of pregnant women and 13% of women who have just given birth experience a mental disorder, mainly depression. The mother may experience perinatal mental illnesses and may experience a range of conditions, including anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, post-partum, psychosis, and post-traumatic stress disorder. NHS outlines that around 20% of mothers in the UK experience perinatal mental illnesses. If the illnesses are not treated, it can affect other members of the family, including children and the father. Around 25 – 50% of fathers will experience perinatal depression. Generally, this is a stressful time for the family who are likely to be under pressure during this time.

Having a child can be a stressful event, as you are unable to undertake activities and have a regular routine which you are used to. Individuals may struggle to adapt to a new way of living. Parents are likely to argue during this stressful time and there is likely to be sleep disturbance throughout the night. The father and mother are likely to spend less time together which impacts their relationship, and it is likely to lead to depression and anxiety.

Initially, most women will experience tearfulness and low mood, as soon the baby has been born, however, if this continues you may be suffering from postnatal depression and perinatal mental illness. Symptoms are different for every mom.

Symptoms of maternal mental health
– Often feeling sad and tearful.
– Anxiety, afraid to be on your own with your baby.
– Struggling to adjust to parenthood and bonding with your baby.
– Feeling stressed and unmotivated.
– Generally feeling more tired than usual but struggling to go to sleep.
– You may feel less interested in eating.
– You may get angry and annoyed more easily.
– Difficulties with clear thinking and making decisions.

maternal mental health
maternal mental health

What to do if you are suffering from maternal mental health
If you are suffering from postnatal depression and perinatal mental health issues, then it is good to initially speak to your loved ones and seek professional help if required. At Secure healthcare Solutions, we want women and families to know that support is available during this difficult time.

The NHS gives some great advice about Mental health experienced during pregnancy. Click here to find out more.

Our healthcare professionals are here to support you, particularly our support workers. They look after the well-being of people in their daily lives. Individuals can be supported with carrying out daily tasks to care for themselves, providing emotional support, and teaching new skills which will help you.

Speak to us today to see how we can support individuals with maternal mental health problems. Email us at homecare@securesolutions.co.uk or call us on 01902 302 017 to discuss how we can support you or your loved ones to provide the best possible care and support.

Mental health is just as important as your physical health and that is why it’s not something that should be neglected. If you are suffering from an illness or if you can’t get out and about like you used to, then it can be detrimental for your mental health. You can find that you don’t want to do activities that you used to be interested in. You could withdraw from yourself and others around you and could end up having potentially harmful thoughts. This is where a home carer can come in. 

They can ensure you aren’t alone

One of the biggest causes of mental health issues can derive from loneliness. This has been especially true during the pandemic, but can be a continuous problem. A survey by Age UK found that over 2 million people in England that are over the age of 75 live on their own. They also found that over a million people go over four weeks with no contact with someone they know such as a neighbor, friend, or family member. If you are lonely it can be hard to reach out.

This might be because of pride or just because you feel helpless. Your carer will be a friendly face that you don’t need to reach out to as they will always be there. Whether you need someone during the day or a live-in carer who is with you all the time, you can rest assured you are in safe hands at all times.

They can give you back your independence

One thing that can take a toll on mental health can be if you lose your independence. A carer can help encourage you to do things yourself at home while knowing you are under watchful supervision. By being able to do these things on your own it can help you feel more positive about yourself. This will therefore help your mental wellbeing. You will feel more like your old self, more capable, and have small daily challenges that when you complete will be a real mood booster.

They can help with brain training activities

Your carer can help to set you up with activities that can boost your mental health. This can include word searches, playing chess with you, sudoku and quizzes. These are all good for keeping you feeling positive and your brain active and healthy. It can also help with dementia and reduce your likelihood of developing it as well as potentially slowing symptoms. They can also play your favorite music and help with other activities that can keep your mind busy. It will also be a welcome distraction from any sad or negative thoughts you might be feeling.

mental health

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

They can address your health concerns

One of the things that could impact your mental health could be if you are worried about your physical wellbeing. If you have recently been diagnosed with a condition then this could leave you feeling worried and anxious, with many questions. A carer has looked after many people and may know the answers to things you are fretting about. If they don’t, they will know the right contacts and be able to get the answers for you.

They can support your family

If your family is looking out for you and know that they are worried about you then it can cause you to feel guilty and impact the way you feel mentally. You might feel like a burden and this can be upsetting. By having a carer you know that your family won’t have to worry about you so much, which in turn can ease your own anxiety and feelings.

These are just a few ways that having a home carer can help with your mental health. If you are suffering mentally make sure you speak to someone and get the help that you deserve. If you are looking for care at home services, we are here to help. Find out more about what we do here.

If you are looking for care at home job, we have a number of vacancies which can be found here.

Thinking and memory skills were most improved when people exercised the heart and muscles on a regular basis, a review of 39 studies found. This remained true in those who already showed signs of cognitive decline. Taking up exercise at any age was worthwhile for the mind and body, the Australian researchers said.

Exercises such as T’ai Chi were recommended for people over the age of 50 who couldn’t manage other more challenging forms of exercise, the study in the British Journal of Sports Medicine said.

Physical activity has long been known to reduce the risk of a number of diseases, including type-2 diabetes and some cancers, and it is thought to play a role in warding off the brain’s natural decline as we enter middle age.

The theory is that through exercise the brain receives a greater supply of blood, oxygen and nutrients that boost its health as well as a growth hormone that helps the formation of new neurons and connections.

In this analysis of previous studies, researchers from the University of Canberra looked at the effects of at least four weeks of structured physical exercise on the brain function of adults.

In a variety of brain tests, they found evidence of aerobic exercise improving cognitive abilities, such as thinking, reading, learning and reasoning, while muscle training – for example, using weights – had a significant effect on memory and the brain’s ability to plan and organise, the so-called executive functions.

Joe Northey, study author and researcher from the Research Institute for Sport and Exercise at Canberra, said the findings were convincing enough to enable both types of exercise to be prescribed to improve brain health in the over-50s.

“Even if you are doing moderate exercise only once or twice a week there are still improvements in cognitive function, but the improvements were better the more exercise was done,” he said.

He said people should be able to hold a conversation while doing moderate exercise.

NHS guidelines recommend that adults do at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity every week and exercise the major muscles on two or more days a week.

As well as staying physically active, Dr David Reynolds, from Alzheimer’s Research UK, said it was equally important to look after our brains by staying mentally active, eating a balanced diet, drinking only in moderation and not smoking.

Thinking and memory skills were most improved when people exercised the heart and muscles on a regular basis, a review of 39 studies found. This remained true in those who already showed signs of cognitive decline. Taking up exercise at any age was worthwhile for the mind and body, the Australian researchers said.

Exercises such as T’ai Chi were recommended for people over the age of 50 who couldn’t manage other more challenging forms of exercise, the study in the British Journal of Sports Medicine said.

Physical activity has long been known to reduce the risk of a number of diseases, including type-2 diabetes and some cancers, and it is thought to play a role in warding off the brain’s natural decline as we enter middle age.

The theory is that through exercise the brain receives a greater supply of blood, oxygen and nutrients that boost its health as well as a growth hormone that helps the formation of new neurons and connections.

In this analysis of previous studies, researchers from the University of Canberra looked at the effects of at least four weeks of structured physical exercise on the brain function of adults.

In a variety of brain tests, they found evidence of aerobic exercise improving cognitive abilities, such as thinking, reading, learning and reasoning, while muscle training – for example, using weights – had a significant effect on memory and the brain’s ability to plan and organise, the so-called executive functions.

Joe Northey, study author and researcher from the Research Institute for Sport and Exercise at Canberra, said the findings were convincing enough to enable both types of exercise to be prescribed to improve brain health in the over-50s.

“Even if you are doing moderate exercise only once or twice a week there are still improvements in cognitive function, but the improvements were better the more exercise was done,” he said.

He said people should be able to hold a conversation while doing moderate exercise.

NHS guidelines recommend that adults do at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity every week and exercise the major muscles on two or more days a week.

As well as staying physically active, Dr David Reynolds, from Alzheimer’s Research UK, said it was equally important to look after our brains by staying mentally active, eating a balanced diet, drinking only in moderation and not smoking.

We’ve become used to hearing stories about how our healthcare professionals, including nurses, are routinely subjected to abuse in the workplace. In most environments, this would not be tolerated but seems to be on the increase in our hospitals, particularly where our A&E departments are concerned.

  • According to Nursing Times, as many as 90% of nurses have experienced violence and verbal abuse while trying to do their job.
  • In 2012, The Telegraph reported that there were some 163 attacks on staff every day and the general consensus is that this situation is no better today.
  • It’s not just a problem that is particular to the UK. A study in America at the turn of the millennium found similar results.
  • The UK, however, currently has one of the highest incidences of violence against nurses in Europe.

But how does abuse affect our healthcare providers and where can they find help and support if they need it?

While the NHS has had a zero-tolerance approach to violence and abusive behaviour since 1999, instances of attacks appear to have remained disappointingly high. Abuse come from a variety of sources including patients and relatives who have mental health problems or simply believe they are not getting the treatment they deserve, as well as those under the influence of alcohol.

Areas such as A&E are at particular risk because of the emergency situations they face, the fact that there is all too often overcrowding and the emotional level many people are operating at when they arrive. While hospitals are under increasing pressure, it’s not just problems with patients and relatives that are at the heart of verbal and physical abuse. The NHS and even private hospitals are not immune from instances of bullying within the workplace.

We expect a lot from our nurses. Often, they’re working long shifts between 12 and 14 hours and managing traumas and medical problems that require urgent attention. We expect them to do this with all the compassion and professionalism they can muster. It’s no wonder that many nurses and other healthcare professionals are revaluating their career choices and deciding whether they want to stay in the profession at all. That goes for people working in a wide range of areas from A&E, the NHS to nursing homes and private care.

While organisations such as the Nursing and Midwifery Council have put in measures to handle instances of verbal or physical abuse in the workplace, there doesn’t seem to have been much change for the better over the last decade or so. The support that nurses get is also still largely piecemeal and varies from trust to trust.

Just like any other group of people, nurses, midwives and healthcare workers need support and can easily find themselves isolated. There’s no doubt that institutions such as the NHS and all the other Nursing Agencies have to do a lot more to protect nurses and other professionals while they are trying to help the people in their care.

The good news is that charitable organisations such as the Cavell Nurses’ Trust have long been providing support for a range of healthcare professionals. Not only do they help when nurses are suffering from hardship and can’t make ends meet, they assist individuals come to terms with illness, life changing experiences and the impact of violence and abuse in the workplace.

We’ve become used to hearing stories about how our healthcare professionals, including nurses, are routinely subjected to abuse in the workplace. In most environments, this would not be tolerated but seems to be on the increase in our hospitals, particularly where our A&E departments are concerned.

  • According to Nursing Times, as many as 90% of nurses have experienced violence and verbal abuse while trying to do their job.
  • In 2012, The Telegraph reported that there were some 163 attacks on staff every day and the general consensus is that this situation is no better today.
  • It’s not just a problem that is particular to the UK. A study in America at the turn of the millennium found similar results.
  • The UK, however, currently has one of the highest incidences of violence against nurses in Europe.

But how does abuse affect our healthcare providers and where can they find help and support if they need it?

While the NHS has had a zero-tolerance approach to violence and abusive behaviour since 1999, instances of attacks appear to have remained disappointingly high. Abuse come from a variety of sources including patients and relatives who have mental health problems or simply believe they are not getting the treatment they deserve, as well as those under the influence of alcohol.

Areas such as A&E are at particular risk because of the emergency situations they face, the fact that there is all too often overcrowding and the emotional level many people are operating at when they arrive. While hospitals are under increasing pressure, it’s not just problems with patients and relatives that are at the heart of verbal and physical abuse. The NHS and even private hospitals are not immune from instances of bullying within the workplace.

We expect a lot from our nurses. Often, they’re working long shifts between 12 and 14 hours and managing traumas and medical problems that require urgent attention. We expect them to do this with all the compassion and professionalism they can muster. It’s no wonder that many nurses and other healthcare professionals are revaluating their career choices and deciding whether they want to stay in the profession at all. That goes for people working in a wide range of areas from A&E, the NHS to nursing homes and private care.

While organisations such as the Nursing and Midwifery Council have put in measures to handle instances of verbal or physical abuse in the workplace, there doesn’t seem to have been much change for the better over the last decade or so. The support that nurses get is also still largely piecemeal and varies from trust to trust.

Just like any other group of people, nurses, midwives and healthcare workers need support and can easily find themselves isolated. There’s no doubt that institutions such as the NHS and all the other Nursing Agencies have to do a lot more to protect nurses and other professionals while they are trying to help the people in their care.

The good news is that charitable organisations such as the Cavell Nurses’ Trust have long been providing support for a range of healthcare professionals. Not only do they help when nurses are suffering from hardship and can’t make ends meet, they assist individuals come to terms with illness, life changing experiences and the impact of violence and abuse in the workplace.

Nursing is Career … Not just a Job

You’re ready for a new job opportunity. Started job search and managed to book yourself an Interview , all is good and as planned, by this point, you need to do your home work to be ready to sell yourself and the best way in doing so is to have a close look at your potential employer’s website.This will help you grow your confidence level and show your future employer you care and want the Job more than the other candidates.

Did you know that you have a chance of asking HR questions before accepting a job offer as a nurse? The widespread shortage of nurses in many places gives you room to be a job seeker with a choice on who to work for. Don’t be timid. Ask questions about what you consider important to you and how you carry out your job. Worth considering the following questions before giving a definite answer :

  1. About salary and allowances

Ask about your starting salary and compare this with what is offered in your area for similar roles .  Inquire about allowances in relation to relocation, overtime and any other special nursing care related duties. Many healthcare agencies fail to guarantee secured working hours for their nurses. A great way to find out is to just ask and check your future employer’s reviews, testimonials and social media accounts.

  1. Job related benefits

What does the company offer for your personal healthcare? This relates to matters such as insurance, paid vacation/leave and maternity leave for women.

  1. Interpersonal relationships

Strive to know the relationship between the administration and the workers.  How easy can you have issues resolved between you and a fellow member of staff or between you and the administration? Does the company have a mentorship program?

  1. Education and Training opportunities

Does the company have a continuing education program that will improve your CV and Overall Career Development ? Opportunities to get certifications in certain areas can help in your professional progression. Many healthcare agencies do offer mandatory training , offer courses and development days to help nurses improve their practice and support their continuing professional development (CPD). It is a great chance to ask your future employer if training is included in your employment contract.

  1. Will your personal special circumstances be considered in your new job role?

This can relate to physical or social-family issues. A pregnant or nursing mother for example may find it challenging to work in certain areas. Such mothers may need a department with more flexibility where it may be possible to take a break or reduce working hours (part time ) when circumstances demand. In addition to talking to the HR officer, talk to nurses and other staff who are already working with the company. You will learn from them some things that HR may not be willing to tell you. All these will help you to decide whether take the job opportunity or not.

If you make it a priority to ask these important questions before you accept a nursing job offer, you’ll be much happier with your decision—whether you accept or decline it. It might seem like a good idea to at first take what you can get, but what you want at the end of the day is to love your job and the best way to achieve this is to do your homework beforehand.

Small things like that can be helpful conversation topics during an interview and, ultimately, they can make all the difference in securing the position. Secure Healthcare Solutions is a specialist in establishment healthcare staffing solutions across England. We are actively recruiting and supplying front line staff in Birmingham and the West Midlands,Northampton, Milton Keynes, London, Manchester and Bristol areas.